precisionism


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pre·ci·sion·ism

also Pre·ci·sion·ism  (prĭ-sĭzh′ə-nĭz′əm)
n.
A style of early 20th-century painting in which depicted scenes or objects are reduced or simplified to elemental structural forms and rendered by a combination of abstractionism and realism.

precisionism

an insistence upon perfection in language, morals, or ritual. — precisionist, n.precisionistic, adj.
See also: Attitudes
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Drawn from the work of watercolorist Raoul Dufy (Autumn), sculptor Naum Gabo (Construct), portrait painter Han Holbein the Younger (Holbein) and the Precisionism movement (Precision) — among many others, Brentano's new contract textiles perform with eco-conscious finishing and contents.
Workers likewise rarely appeared in images of industry by Precisionist painters like Sheeler, Dumuth, and Lozowick, as noted by Fraser in "Hands off the Machine" and Sharon Corwin in "Picturing Efficiency: Precisionism, Scientific Management, and the Effacement of Labor," Representations, 84 (November 2003), 139-165.
Rivera was inspired by People's NYC, although his powerfully plutocratic vision is closer to Charles Sheeler's factory Precisionism than it is to Photo League pathos, and his subjects are hardly the declasse little people who populate "The Radical Camera.
Both Comenius's and the Unity's preference for simplicity and pragmatism and their distaste for theological precisionism that led to repeated outbreaks of political-religious violence still speak powerfully to a religiously fraught twenty-first century.
Specializing in Abstract Expressionism, Precisionism, Modernism, African American and Regional Art, Adams' gallery achieved international recognition over the years, with thanks to Adams' strong conviction and sophisticated eye for talent.
But such an indictment ignores the fact that evangelicals--fundamentalists especially--care deeply about matters of faith and theology; they embrace a kind of doctrinal precisionism.
They cover precisionism in the 1920s and 1930s, the scene above and below the streets of New York, the Syracuse printmakers, and the memories of Herbert Pullinger, Abe Blashko, Mark Freeman and Charles Keller.
In considering Hemingway's use of the still life as a visual partner to narrative, it is useful to place this strategy in the context of American Precisionism, a movement in painting that emphasized the "thingness of things," the essential power inherent in everyday objects, as in Williams's famed red wheelbarrow.
Precisionism was a fairly short-lived movement (1920-30s) that stemmed from Cubism (1908-20) in Europe, and was pioneered in the United States mostly by Charles Sheeler and Charles Demuth.
Cauman doesn't mention Precisionism once, despite the inclusion of Charles Demuth's Precisionist Sail: In Two Movements (1919) and Stella's American Landscape (Gas Tank) (1918).
The playful experimentation of early modernism gave way to the classicizing abstraction of Precisionism.