pre-Columbian

(redirected from precolumbian)

pre-Co·lum·bi·an

also pre·co·lum·bi·an (prē′kə-lŭm′bē-ən)
adj.
Of, relating to, or originating in the Americas before the arrival of Columbus: pre-Columbian art.

pre-Columbian

adj
(Historical Terms) of or relating to the Americas before they were discovered by Columbus

pre-Co•lum•bi•an

(ˌpri kəˈlʌm bi ən)

adj.
of or pertaining to the Americas before the arrival of Columbus.
[1885–90]

pre-Columbian

Belonging to the Americas in the period before the arrival of Christopher Columbus.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.pre-Columbian - of or relating to or originating in the Americas before the arrival of Columbus
Translations

pre-Columbian

[ˈpriːkəˈlʌmbɪən] ADJprecolombino
References in periodicals archive ?
From the Aztecs their tax systems: Of the Incas their accounts, and of the Mayas their scripture; the outcome is the PreColumbian accounting.
Paradox and promise: Research on the role of recent advances in paleodemography and paleoepidemiology to the study of "health" in Precolumbian societies.
Furthermore, it is a precolumbian place name, and a part of our indigenous heritage; finally, it refers to the non-feminine space linked to the language and the writing.
Relics of the Past: The Collecting and Study of PreColumbian Antiquities in Peru andChile, 1837-1911.
A case of hookworm infestation in a Precolumbian American.
A New Look at PreColumbian Mesoamerican Collections", en Anthronotes.
The precolumbian hypothesis presumes that syphilis and other treponemal diseases were widely spread in both of the Worlds, the endemic syphilis emerging around 7000 BC, as a consequence of climate changes; around 3000 BC the sexually transmitted syphilis may have emerged from endemic syphilis in South Western Asia, also because of climate changes.
However, pitayas have been known and consumed since preColumbian times in their native countries (CRANE; BALERDI, 2005).
A consummate rag-picker, Benwell mines such diverse fields as ancient Greek sculpture, Picasso's paintings, preColumbian pottery and 18th century porcelain painting for a rich palette of formal references; as John McPhee has noted: "While it is possible to occasionally identify a source, Benwell always manages to create an unexpected shape.
Probably the best-known example of biochar being deliberately added to soils is in the Amazon basin of Brazil, where preColumbian people from about 450 BC to 950 AD added a mixture of biochar, bone and manure to relatively nutrient-poor Amazonian soils over time to develop very dark, fertile soil that can be more than 6 feet deep.