preconquest

preconquest

(priːˈkɒnkwɛst; priːˈkɒŋkwɛst)
adj
occurring, existing or produced in a period prior to the conquest of a country, esp the Norman Conquest; of or pertaining to such a period
References in periodicals archive ?
Hyles begins with the assertion that the preconquest era was a homogenous period during which the Guiana shield was home to a single, pan-Guianese indigenous culture.
Indians, however, resisted this form of forced acculturation "by regrouping within pueblos de indios around preconquest lineage structures" (p.
Despite differences in tribal affiliation, regional location, urban or reservation background, academic or community setting, and pro- or anti-feminist ideology, many Native women academics and grassroots activists alike invoke models of preconquest, egalitarian societies to theorize contemporary social and political praxes.
For most Filipinos, whose preconquest ancestors found elaborate rituals to honor their dead and whose contemporary belief system keeps the tradition of having such rituals, the terms sound heartless.
In addition, though their racial categorization--"Indians"--was crucial to white settler ideology, it is not generally one that they have embraced themselves, except for contingent reasons of political solidarity against the white man, since they retain their preconquest civilizational identities.
Preconquest history in Colonial Texcoco", Journal de la Societe des Americanistes, 84 (2), 1998, p.
The rulers of preconquest Tenochtitlan (Mexico City) "engaged in coalition building, an inherently political process, which they brought with them into the formation of the native cabildo," or town council (20).
Koopmans mentions two preconquest collections of miracles known to us only through a later recension, but states: 'neither of these .
But a few pages later Sigal states, "I wish to develop a theoretically and methodologically informed historical ethnography of Nahua sexuality in the late preconquest and early colonial years" (26).