precontact


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precontact

(priːˈkɒntækt)
n
prior contact
adj
1. (Anthropology & Ethnology) of or pertaining to a culture with which another, usually the Western world, has not yet made contact
2. of or pertaining to the state of an object immediately prior to (usually physical) contact with another, esp of a plane with a runway; occurring or implemented during the period immediately prior to contact
References in periodicals archive ?
Swindler's efforts with the boys is fulfilling one of the many objectives of Wanuskewin Heritage Park, to increase public knowledge regarding the Northern Plains Indian culture from precontact times to the present.
Hart believed that this reflected fertility levels under a precontact regime.
Indeed, if one equates Indian identity with the preservation of a genetic purity, a unique language, or cultural lifestyle traceable to undisturbed precontact cultures, the answer to the question: "What is so Indian about the Indian?
55) Moraga now avoids collapsing india and "woman" by emphasizing the gender distinctions within precontact indigenous culture.
For aggregate estimates of the precontact indigenous population of the Caribbean Basin, see Denevan (1976), Dobyns (1983), and Thornton (1987).
Archeologists excavating at Like-a-Fishhook found an overwhelming preponderance of metal tools, and Buffalo Bird Woman remembered from her youth only one man who made stone tools, although patterns of work and warfare had changed relatively little from the precontact era.
Matthew also emphasizes the importance of incorporating the history of precontact native societies into the history of the colonial period in a way that treats native history as a continuum.
Put in the simplest terms, let us say that Oskison did not write of the precontact past--which he never knew--with nostalgia and that he described Indians who had in themselves the means to be at ease in American society.
The Formation of Primitive States in PreContact Hawaii'.
Precontact population contraction and expansion in Newfoundland, 1200-1000 cal BP.
Contemporary knowledge of the precontact history of California's largest tribe (2) is due in part to the contributions of two Yurok men, Captain Spott (Haaganors) and his adoptive son, Robert.
Even the analyses of Native religions in the Precontact Period overemphasize tribal groups made famous by the recent surge in New Age spirituality (the Lakota and the Hopi) and ignore more important developments, such as the rise of the Mississippian chiefdoms of the southeast.