precursive


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal.

pre·cur·sive

 (prĭ-kûr′sĭv)
adj.
Precursory.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Her diagnosis seems most plausible, if still quite conjectural, in relation to the mysterious illness EBB experienced in adolescence and the feelings of recurrent weakness she registers in her 1831-32 diary, especially the "horrible dead precursive feeling" she describes feeling "all thro' my hands & feet" (cited, p.
The anacreontic lyric is an example of non-canonical writing that is not subversive of the canon, but rather a significant precursive formation of canonical literature: "minor forms like the Anacreontic--a major tradition of minor writing, in this case should alert us to the complexities of ferment within and to the competitive struggle that ruffles and animates greater writing" (218).
They develop a diagnostic checklist according to which a problem is strategic if most of the following criteria are fulfilled: The problem occurrences are rare, the consequences are radical, serious, widespread, long-lasting and precursive with many parties involved.
For Percy, then, the dung beetle functions as a precursive sign pointing toward Christ's crucifixion in which all that is high is made low and all that is low is lifted up.