precursor


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pre·cur·sor

 (prĭ-kûr′sər, prē′kûr′sər)
n.
1. One that precedes and indicates, suggests, or announces someone or something to come: Colonial opposition to unfair taxation by the British was a precursor of the Revolution.
2. One that precedes another; a forerunner or predecessor: The new principal's precursor was an eminent educator.
3. A biochemical substance, such as an intermediate compound in a chain of enzymatic reactions, from which a more stable or definitive product is formed: a precursor of insulin.

[Middle English precursoure, from Old French precurseur, from Latin praecursor, from praecursus, past participle of praecurrere, to run before : prae-, pre- + currere, to run; see kers- in Indo-European roots.]

precursor

(prɪˈkɜːsə)
n
1. a person or thing that precedes and shows or announces someone or something to come; harbinger
2. a predecessor or forerunner
3. (Chemistry) a chemical substance that gives rise to another more important substance
[C16: from Latin praecursor one who runs in front, from praecurrere, from prae in front + currere to run]

pre•cur•sor

(prɪˈkɜr sər, ˈpri kɜr-)

n.
1. a person or thing that precedes, as in a job or a method; predecessor.
2. a person, animal, or thing regarded as a harbinger: The first robin is a precursor of spring.
3. a chemical that is transformed into another compound, as in the course of a chemical reaction, and therefore precedes that compound in the synthetic pathway: Cholesterol is a precursor of testosterone.
4. a cell or tissue that gives rise to a variant, specialized, or more mature form.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin]
pre•cur′so•ry, adj.

precursor

Any chemical reactant which takes place at any stage in the production by whatever method of a toxic chemical. This includes any key component of a binary or multicomponent chemical system. See also toxic chemical.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.precursor - a substance from which another substance is formed (especially by a metabolic reaction)
biochemistry - the organic chemistry of compounds and processes occurring in organisms; the effort to understand biology within the context of chemistry
material, stuff - the tangible substance that goes into the makeup of a physical object; "coal is a hard black material"; "wheat is the stuff they use to make bread"
2.precursor - a person who goes before or announces the coming of another
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
predecessor - one who precedes you in time (as in holding a position or office)
3.precursor - something that precedes and indicates the approach of something or someone
indicant, indication - something that serves to indicate or suggest; "an indication of foul play"; "indications of strain"; "symptoms are the prime indicants of disease"

precursor

noun
1. forerunner, pioneer, predecessor, forebear, antecedent, originator Real tennis, a precursor of the modern game, originated in the eleventh century.
2. herald, usher, messenger, vanguard, forerunner, harbinger The deal should not be seen as a precursor to a merger.

precursor

noun
1. One that indicates or announces someone or something to come:
2. One that precedes, as in time:
Translations
PräkursorVorläufer

precursor

[priːˈkɜːsəʳ] Nprecursor(a) m/f

precursor

[priːˈkɜːrr] n
(= person) → précurseur m (= thing) → précurseur m (= event) → précurseur m
a precursor of sth → un précurseur de qch
a precursor to sth → un précurseur de qch
(CHEMISTRY) (also precursor chemical) → précurseur m

precursor

nVorläufer(in) m(f); (= herald: of event etc) → Vorbote m, → Vorbotin f; (in office) → (Amts)vorgänger(in) m(f)

precursor

[ˌpriːˈkɜːsəʳ] nprecursore m

pre·cur·sor

n. precursor-a, predecesor-a, manifestación tal como la aparición de un síntoma o señal antes de desarrollarse una enfermedad;
a. precursor-a, predecesor-a; preliminar.

precursor

n precursor m
References in classic literature ?
Raising a shout of triumph, he sprang toward the defenseless Cora, sending his keen axe as the dreadful precursor of his approach.
One glow of this kind, however, was often the precursor of gloom for many hours afterward; because, when the glow left him, he seemed conscious of a missing sense and power, and groped about for them, as if a blind man should go seeking his lost eyesight.
She made an effort to alter her position, but failed: her face changed; she seemed to experience some inward sensation--the precursor, perhaps, of the last pang.
The storm increase, the flashes succeeded one another more rapidly, the thunder began to growl, and the wind, the precursor of a hurricane, whistled in the plumes and the hair of the horsemen.
As he passes in, we have a parting glimpse of his visage, and recognize the crafty smile, which was the precursor of the little joke that he has ever since been playing off at his wife's expense.
He will find it as sure a precursor of his fate as Openshaw did before him.
Whether it be Providence or Fate, Gutenburg is the precursor of Luther.
Again I saw that grim face look over the cliff, and I knew that it was the precursor of another stone.
The countess was accustomed to this tone as a precursor of news of something detrimental to the children's interests, such as the building of a new gallery or conservatory, the inauguration of a private theater or an orchestra.
Rarity, as geology tells us, is the precursor to extinction.
There were, however, exceptional authors, genuine artists, masters of meter and narrative, possessed by a true feeling for beauty; and in some of the romances the psychological analysis of love, in particular, is subtile and powerful, the direct precursor of one of the main developments in modern fiction.
Against this ebullition of wounded female pride, the experienced husband made no other head, than by an occasional exclamation, which he intended to be precursor of a simple asseveration of his own innocence.