predatory

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pred·a·to·ry

 (prĕd′ə-tôr′ē)
adj.
1. Living or characterized by preying on other animals: a predatory insect; predatory instincts.
2.
a. Living or characterized by plundering, pillaging, or marauding.
b. Living or characterized by the exploitation of others for personal gain: predatory business practices.

[Latin praedātōrius, plundering, from praedārī, to plunder, from praeda, booty; see ghend- in Indo-European roots.]

pred′a·to′ri·ly adv.
pred′a·to′ri·ness n.

predatory

(ˈprɛdətərɪ; -trɪ)
adj
1. (Zoology) zoology another word for predacious1
2. of, involving, or characterized by plundering, robbing, etc
[C16: from Latin praedātōrius rapacious, from praedārī to pillage, from praeda booty]
ˈpredatorily adv
ˈpredatoriness n

pred•a•to•ry

(ˈprɛd əˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i)

adj.
1. preying upon other organisms for food.
2. characterized by plunder, robbery, or exploitation: predatory tactics.
3. engaging in or living by these activities: predatory bands of brigands.
4. acting with or indicative of rapacious, greedy, or selfish motives.
[1580–90; < Latin praedātōrius. See predator, -tory1]
pred`a•to′ri•ly, adv.
pred′a•to`ri•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.predatory - characterized by plundering or pillaging or maraudingpredatory - characterized by plundering or pillaging or marauding; "bands of marauding Indians"; "predatory warfare"; "a raiding party"
offensive - for the purpose of attack rather than defense; "offensive weapons"
2.predatory - living by preying on other animals especially by catching living preypredatory - living by preying on other animals especially by catching living prey; "a predatory bird"; "the rapacious wolf"; "raptorial birds"; "ravening wolves"; "a vulturine taste for offal"
aggressive - having or showing determination and energetic pursuit of your ends; "an aggressive businessman"; "an aggressive basketball player"; "he was aggressive and imperious; positive in his convictions"; "aggressive drivers"
3.predatory - living by or given to victimizing others for personal gain; "predatory capitalists"; "a predatory, insensate society in which innocence and decency can prove fatal"- Peter S. Prescott; "a predacious kind of animal--the early geological gangster"- W.E.Swinton
acquisitive - eager to acquire and possess things especially material possessions or ideas; "an acquisitive mind"; "an acquisitive society in which the craving for material things seems never satisfied"

predatory

adjective
1. hunting, ravening, carnivorous, rapacious, raptorial, predacious predatory birds like the eagle
3. rapacious, greedy, voracious, vulturous, vulturine predatory business practices
Translations
مُفْتَرِس، ضار
dravý
rán-
dravý

predatory

[ˈpredətərɪ] ADJ [animal] → depredador; [bird] → de presa, rapaz; [person] → rapaz; [look] → devorador

predatory

[ˈprɛdətəri] adj
[bird, fish, animal] → prédateur/trice
[company, man, woman] → prédateur/trice

predatory

adj
(= involving killing) attack, tribe, behaviourräuberisch; predatory animalRaubtier nt; predatory instinctRaubtierinstinkt m
(financially etc) person, behaviourraubtierhaft
(sexually) personraubtierhaft; he has a predatory attitude toward(s) all the girls in the officeer betrachtet alle Mädchen im Büro als Freiwild

predatory

[ˈprɛdətrɪ] adj (animal) → rapace, predatore/trice; (habits, army) → rapace; (person, look) → avido/a, cupido/a

predator

(ˈpredətə) noun
a bird, eg a hawk, or animal, eg a lion, that attacks and kills others for food.
ˈpredatory adjective
living by attacking and feeding on others. a predatory animal.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ali Zafar as the bewildered Pakistani boyfriend and Kirron Kher as his scattered mother-in-law-to-be project a prowling predatoriness to their scenes together.
A male nurse caring for a male patient can arouse fears of homosexuality or the fear of sexual predatoriness or paedophilia when caring for women or children.
Contrary to the popular image of the innocent masses, corruption and predatoriness are not found exclusively amongst the powerful.
Spencer argues that Auden's affectionate sobriquet for Yeats, "the eagle," is fitting insofar as Yeats was gifted with "far-sightedness, predatoriness and a certain grandeur" and soared above the confines of nationalism with a "freedom from locality and restraint" (90).
Lamming's authorial intention is to demonstrate that from a relatively weak and disadvantaged position of lack of knowledge about the predatoriness and parasitism of colonialism and imperialism, the people of Creighton village and, indeed, Barbados have reached their epiphany, just like the hero has also come of age to be able to define and re-define his milieu and his Caribbeanness.
As the son of a zookeeper, Pi witnessed the routine cruelty to animals that would lead him, as an adult, to observe of human beings: "our species' excessive predatoriness has made the entire planet our prey" (31).
Its illustration of protracted adolescence, sexual predatoriness, selfishness, emotional insecurity and competitiveness no longer has anything fresh to teach us.