predeath

predeath

(priːˈdɛθ)
adj
occurring before or in the lead-up to death; of or pertaining to the period immediately prior to death
References in periodicals archive ?
Risk factors that emerged as most salient and, therefore, were considered confirmed based on their review of the literature included (a) low levels of social support, (b) avoidant/anxious/insecure attachment style, (c) discovering the body (in cases of violent death) or dissatisfaction with death notification, (d) being a spouse or a parent of the deceased, (e) high levels of predeath marital dependency, and (f) high levels of neuroticism.
The use of the $5 million valuation would give rise to a $5 million tax basis, subsequently enabling the taxpayer's heirs to experience a smaller taxable gain, a larger deductible loss, or more robust depreciation deductions in comparison to the predeath gift scenario.
So, in many cases, an individual is selected for the predeath period, while a corporate trustee (with or without individual co-trustees) takes over the burdensome task of trust administration after the death of the grantor.
Of course, the primary challenge to rational comprehension is that the entire tale, even the remembered predeath days, is told from the perspective of a dead man, and the normal regulatory logic of everyday reality no longer applies.
The temporary regulations do allow a portion of the predeath payments to qualify as alimony when the postdeath payments are less than scheduled predeath payments.
Sex Date of death hospital (mo) predeath (mo) 2 F Mar 8, 1901 0.
In this study, the predeath ferritin level was 891 [+ or -] 476 (versus 619 [+ or -] 345 ng/mL as an initial value).
accrued) but uncollected at death is not included in the decedent's predeath taxable income.
Therefore, the sampled monthly claim rates included the predeath claim experience of individuals who died during the observation period.
In many ways, it was too bad that she couldn't have participated in the event, that there wasn't a way to develop predeath rituals that might include the dying person, just as we have developed postdeath rituals for those who survive.
The second question then asked respondents to select the largest amount they would be willing to pay (or have their estate pay) to prevent their organs from being removed, assuming that an organ procurement organization had the right to collect their organs without permission and in the absence of such a predeath agreement.