predecessor

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Related to predecessors: congruity, captious, diatribe

pred·e·ces·sor

 (prĕd′ĭ-sĕs′ər, prē′dĭ-)
n.
1. One who precedes another in time, especially in holding an office or position.
2. Something that has been succeeded by another: The new building is more spacious than its predecessor.
3. An ancestor; a forebear.

[Middle English predecessoure, from Old French predecesseur, from Late Latin praedēcessor : Latin prae-, pre- + Latin dēcessor, a retiring magistrate (from dēcessus, past participle of dēcēdere, to depart : dē-, away; see de- + cēdere, to go; see ked- in Indo-European roots).]

predecessor

(ˈpriːdɪˌsɛsə)
n
1. a person who precedes another, as in an office
2. something that precedes something else
3. an ancestor; forefather
[C14: via Old French from Late Latin praedēcessor, from prae before + dēcēdere to go away, from away + cēdere to go]

pred•e•ces•sor

(ˈprɛd əˌsɛs ər; esp. Brit. ˈpri də-)

n.
1. a person who precedes another in an office, position, etc.
2. something succeeded or replaced by something else.
3. Archaic. an ancestor; forefather.
[1250–1300; Middle English predecessour < Anglo-French < Late Latin praedēcessor= Latin prae- pre- + dēcessor retiring official, derivative (with -tor -tor) of dēcēdere to withdraw =dē- de- + cēdere to yield; see cede]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.predecessor - one who precedes you in time (as in holding a position or office)
forerunner, precursor - a person who goes before or announces the coming of another
forefather - person from an earlier time who contributed to the tradition shared by some group; "our forefathers brought forth a great nation"
2.predecessor - something that precedes and indicates the approach of something or someone
indicant, indication - something that serves to indicate or suggest; "an indication of foul play"; "indications of strain"; "symptoms are the prime indicants of disease"

predecessor

noun
1. previous job holder, precursor, forerunner, antecedent, former job holder, prior job holder He learned everything he knew from his predecessor.
2. ancestor, forebear, antecedent, forefather opportunities our predecessors never had

predecessor

noun
1. One that precedes, as in time:
2. Archaic. A person from whom one is descended:
Translations
السّابِق في الوَظيفَهسَلَف
předchůdcepředek
forgængerforfader
edeltäjä
prethodnik
elõd
forfaîirfyrirrennari, forveri
前任者前機種
전임자
priekšgājējssenči
föregångare
คนที่อยู่มาก่อน
selefatacetöncel
người tiền nhiệm

predecessor

[ˈpriːdɪsesəʳ] Npredecesor(a) m/f, antecesor(a) m/f

predecessor

[ˈpriːdɪsɛsər] n
(= person) → prédécesseur m
[object, machine] → prédécesseur m

predecessor

n (= person)Vorgänger(in) m(f); (= thing)Vorläufer(in) m(f); our predecessors (= ancestors)unsere Ahnen or Vorfahren pl; his latest book is certainly better than its predecessorssein neuestes Buch ist zweifellos besser als seine vorherigen

predecessor

[ˈpriːdɪˌsɛsəʳ] npredecessore m

predecessor

(ˈpriːdisesə) , ((American) ˈpre-) noun
1. someone who has had a particular job or position before. He was my predecessor as manager.
2. an ancestor. My predecessors came from Scotland.

predecessor

الشَّخْصُ الَّذِي سَبَقَ فُلاناً فِي الوَظِيفَةِ předchůdce forgænger Vorgänger προκάτοχος predecesor edeltäjä prédécesseur prethodnik predecessore 前任者 전임자 voorganger forgjenger poprzednik predecessor предшественник föregångare คนที่อยู่มาก่อน selef người tiền nhiệm 前任
References in classic literature ?
The hopes and fears of those on board of the ship were in tumultuous agitation, as the boat drew nigh that was to let them know the fortunes of the enterprise, and the fate of their predecessors.
For four generations your royal predecessors disputed about possession of that island, without falling out.
I feel the need to ascribe to him fantastic theories about his predecessors, and it is with a certain sense of disillusion that I confess he thought about them pretty much as does everybody else.
6, it was declared to be in the king alone, for that the sole supreme government and command of the militia within his Majesty's realms and dominions, and of all forces by sea and land, and of all forts and places of strength, EVER WAS AND IS the undoubted right of his Majesty and his royal predecessors, kings and queens of England, and that both or either house of Parliament cannot nor ought to pretend to the same.
Had the convention taken the first method of adopting the second article of Confederation, it is evident that the new Congress would be continually exposed, as their predecessors have been, to the alternative of construing the term "EXPRESSLY" with so much rigor, as to disarm the government of all real authority whatever, or with so much latitude as to destroy altogether the force of the restriction.
We have traditions among us of the enjoyments of our predecessors, as they rioted in the fertility of their cis-atlantic field; a happy company of thriving and luxuriant plants.
No iron ship of yesterday ever attained the marvels of speed which the seamanship of men famous in their time had obtained from their wooden, copper-sheeted predecessors.
Richardson, Barth, and Overweg, jealously anxious to push their investigations farther, arrived at Tunis and Tripoli, like their predecessors, and got as far as Mourzouk, the capital of Fezzan.
Tied or trussed like fowls or pigs, they were tumbled on the hard- packed earthen floor, beneath which, shallowly buried, lay the remains of ancient chiefs, while, overhead, in wrappings of grass mats, swung all that was left of several of Bashti's immediate predecessors, his father latest among them and so swinging for two full generations.
From this complacence, the critics have been emboldened to assume a dictatorial power, and have so far succeeded, that they are now become the masters, and have the assurance to give laws to those authors from whose predecessors they originally received them.
A STATE Official carrying off the Dome of the Capitol met the Ghost of his predecessor, who had come out of his political grave to warn him that God saw him.
If they continued to sing like their great predecessor of romantic themes, they were drawn as by a kind of magnetic attraction into the Homeric style and manner of treatment, and became mere echoes of the Homeric voice: in a word, Homer had so completely exhausted the epic genre, that after him further efforts were doomed to be merely conventional.