predict

(redirected from predicted)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia.

pre·dict

 (prĭ-dĭkt′)
v. pre·dict·ed, pre·dict·ing, pre·dicts
v.tr.
To state, tell about, or make known in advance, especially on the basis of special knowledge: predicted an active hurricane season because of warmer ocean-surface temperatures.
v.intr.
To foretell something.

[Latin praedīcere, praedict- : prae-, pre- + dīcere, to say; see deik- in Indo-European roots.]

pre·dict′a·bil′i·ty n.
pre·dict′a·ble adj.
pre·dict′a·bly adv.
pre·dic′tive adj.
pre·dic′tive·ly adv.
pre·dic′tor n.
Synonyms: predict, call, forecast, foretell, prognosticate
These verbs mean to tell about something in advance of its occurrence by means of special knowledge or inference: predict an eclipse; couldn't call the outcome of the game; forecasting the weather; foretold events that would happen; prognosticating a rebellion.

predict

(prɪˈdɪkt)
vb
(tr; may take a clause as object) to state or make a declaration about in advance, esp on a reasoned basis; foretell
[C17: from Latin praedīcere to mention beforehand, from prae before + dīcere to say]
preˈdictable adj
preˌdictaˈbility, preˈdictableness n
preˈdictably adv

pre•dict

(prɪˈdɪkt)

v.t.
1. to declare or tell in advance; foretell.
v.i.
2. to foretell the future; make a prediction.
[1540–50; < Latin praedictus, past participle of praedīcere to foretell =prae- pre- + dīcere to say]
pre•dict′a•ble, adj.
pre•dict`a•bil′i•ty, n.
pre•dict′a•bly, adv.
pre•dic′tive, adj.
pre•dic′tive•ly, adv.
pre•dic′tor, n.
syn: predict, prophesy, foresee, forecast mean to know or tell beforehand what will happen. To predict is usu. to foretell with precision of calculation, knowledge, or shrewd inference from facts or experience: Astronomers can predict an eclipse; it may, however, be used without the implication of knowledge or expertise: I predict it will be a successful party. To prophesy is usu. to predict future events by the aid of divine or supernatural inspiration: Merlin prophesied that two knights would meet in conflict; this verb, too, may be used in a less specific sense: I prophesy she'll be back in the old job. foresee refers specifically not to the uttering of predictions but to the mental act of seeing ahead; there is often a practical implication of preparing for what will happen: He was able to foresee their objections. forecast means to predict by observation or study; however, it is most often used of phenomena that cannot be accurately predicted: Rain is forecast for tonight.

predict


Past participle: predicted
Gerund: predicting

Imperative
predict
predict
Present
I predict
you predict
he/she/it predicts
we predict
you predict
they predict
Preterite
I predicted
you predicted
he/she/it predicted
we predicted
you predicted
they predicted
Present Continuous
I am predicting
you are predicting
he/she/it is predicting
we are predicting
you are predicting
they are predicting
Present Perfect
I have predicted
you have predicted
he/she/it has predicted
we have predicted
you have predicted
they have predicted
Past Continuous
I was predicting
you were predicting
he/she/it was predicting
we were predicting
you were predicting
they were predicting
Past Perfect
I had predicted
you had predicted
he/she/it had predicted
we had predicted
you had predicted
they had predicted
Future
I will predict
you will predict
he/she/it will predict
we will predict
you will predict
they will predict
Future Perfect
I will have predicted
you will have predicted
he/she/it will have predicted
we will have predicted
you will have predicted
they will have predicted
Future Continuous
I will be predicting
you will be predicting
he/she/it will be predicting
we will be predicting
you will be predicting
they will be predicting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been predicting
you have been predicting
he/she/it has been predicting
we have been predicting
you have been predicting
they have been predicting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been predicting
you will have been predicting
he/she/it will have been predicting
we will have been predicting
you will have been predicting
they will have been predicting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been predicting
you had been predicting
he/she/it had been predicting
we had been predicting
you had been predicting
they had been predicting
Conditional
I would predict
you would predict
he/she/it would predict
we would predict
you would predict
they would predict
Past Conditional
I would have predicted
you would have predicted
he/she/it would have predicted
we would have predicted
you would have predicted
they would have predicted
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.predict - make a prediction about; tell in advance; "Call the outcome of an election"
read - interpret the significance of, as of palms, tea leaves, intestines, the sky; also of human behavior; "She read the sky and predicted rain"; "I can't read his strange behavior"; "The fortune teller read his fate in the crystal ball"
hazard, guess, venture, pretend - put forward, of a guess, in spite of possible refutation; "I am guessing that the price of real estate will rise again"; "I cannot pretend to say that you are wrong"
outguess, second-guess - attempt to anticipate or predict
augur - predict from an omen
bet, wager - maintain with or as if with a bet; "I bet she will be there!"
forecast, calculate - predict in advance
prophesy, vaticinate - predict or reveal through, or as if through, divine inspiration
2.predict - indicate by signspredict - indicate by signs; "These signs bode bad news"
threaten - to be a menacing indication of something:"The clouds threaten rain"; "Danger threatens"
bespeak, betoken, indicate, signal, point - be a signal for or a symptom of; "These symptoms indicate a serious illness"; "Her behavior points to a severe neurosis"; "The economic indicators signal that the euro is undervalued"
foreshow - foretell by divine inspiration

predict

verb foretell, forecast, divine, foresee, prophesy, call, augur, presage, portend, prognosticate, forebode, soothsay, vaticinate (rare) Nobody can predict what will happen.
Quotations
"You can only predict things after they happen" [Eugène Ionesco]

predict

verb
To tell about or make known (future events) in advance, especially by means of special knowledge or inference:
Translations
يَتَنَبَّأ، يَتَكَهَّنيَتوَقَع
předpověďpředpovědet
forudsigespå
ennustaa
predvidjeti
elõre megmond
spá
予想する
예측하다
nuspėjamasnuspėjimaspranašystė
paredzētpareģot
napovedati
förutsäga
ทำนาย
đoán trước

predict

[prɪˈdɪkt] VTpredecir, pronosticar, prever
"it'll end in disaster," he predicted-será un desastre, -predijo or -pronosticó
the predicted fall in interest rates has not materializedla bajada de los tipos de interés que estaba prevista aún no se ha materializado
the motion was passed, as predictedla moción se aprobó como se había previsto or pronosticado
I can't predict the futureno puedo predecir or prever el futuro
he predicted a brilliant future for the childle predijo un futuro brillante al niño
to predict thatpredecir que, pronosticar que
nobody can predict what will happennadie puede predecir lo que va a pasar

predict

[prɪˈdɪkt] vtprédire
to predict (that) ... → prédire que ...

predict

predict

[prɪˈdɪkt] vtpredire

predict

(priˈdikt) verb
to say in advance; to foretell. He predicted a change in the weather.
preˈdictable adjective
(negative unpredictable) able to be foretold. His anger was predictable.
preˈdiction (-ʃən) noun
I'm making no predictions about the result of the race.

predict

يَتوَقَع předpovědet forudsige vorhersagen προλέγω predecir ennustaa prédire predvidjeti predire 予想する 예측하다 voorspellen forutsi przepowiedzieć predizer предсказывать förutsäga ทำนาย öngörmek đoán trước 预言

predict

v. predecir, preanunciar, profetizar.

predict

vt predecir, pronosticar; I can’t predict how long she will live..No puedo predecir cuánto tiempo va a vivir.
References in classic literature ?
And, lastly, the Owl, seeing an archer approach, predicted that this man, being on foot, would contrive darts armed with feathers which would fly faster than the wings of the Birds themselves.
THE Chief of the Weather Bureau having predicted a fine day, a Thrifty Person hastened to lay in a large stock of umbrellas, which he exposed for sale on the sidewalk; but the weather remained clear, and nobody would buy.
Their coming could have been predicted with the same certitude that astronomers to-day predict the outcome of the movements of stars.
Practice has now given my fair relative the confidence which I predicted would come with time.
The deity predicted certain disaster to the presumptuous mortal who laid hands on the sacred gem, and to all of his house and name who received it after him.
I tell you," one of them was saying, "that if Coysel predicted that, 'tis as good as true; I know nothing about it, but I have heard say that he's not only an astrologer, but a magician.
An officer of the Cuirassier Life Guards, a handsome prince who everyone predicted would become aide-de-camp to the Emperor Nicholas I and have a brilliant career, left the service, broke off his engagement to a beautiful maid of honour, a favourite of the Empress's, gave his small estate to his sister, and retired to a monastery to become a monk.
Every Russian might have predicted it, not by reasoning but by the feeling implanted in each of us and in our fathers.
Nothing had been heard of them since their departure from the Arickara village; Lisa, who parted from them there, had predicted their destruction; and some of the traders of the Northwest Company had actually spread a rumor of their having been cut off by the Indians.
The women all failing, from the handsome housekeeper downward, to make the smallest impression on him, consoled themselves by prophetic visions of his future relations with the sex, and predicted vindictively that "his time would come.
The disease, as Guenaud had predicted, had become worse; it was no longer an attack of gout, it was an attack of death; then there was another thing which made that agony more agonizing still, -- and that was the agitation brought into his mind by the donation he had sent to the king, and which, according to Colbert, the king ought to send back unaccepted to the cardinal.
Every time my sword hung fast to my shoulder-belt, it always predicted some disagreeable commission or another for me to execute, and I have had showers of them all my life through.