predilection


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pred·i·lec·tion

 (prĕd′l-ĕk′shən, prēd′-)
n.
A special liking for something; a preference.

[French prédilection, from Old French, from Medieval Latin praedīlēctus, past participle of praedīligere, to prefer : Latin prae-, pre- + Latin dīligere, to love; see diligent.]
Synonyms: predilection, leaning, partiality, penchant
These nouns denote a predisposition to favor someone or something particular: a predilection for classical composers; conservative leanings; a partiality for liberal-minded friends; a penchant for exotic foods.

predilection

(ˌpriːdɪˈlɛkʃən)
n
a predisposition, preference, or bias
[C18: from French prédilection, from Medieval Latin praedīligere to prefer, from Latin prae before + dīligere to love]

pre•di•lec•tion

(ˌprɛd lˈɛk ʃən, ˌprid-)

n.
a tendency to think favorably of something in particular; partiality; preference.
[1735–45; < French prédilection, derivative (with Latin -tiō -tion) of Medieval Latin praedīligere to prefer]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.predilection - a predisposition in favor of something; "a predilection for expensive cars"; "his sexual preferences"; "showed a Marxist orientation"
predisposition - an inclination beforehand to interpret statements in a particular way
2.predilection - a strong likingpredilection - a strong liking; "my own preference is for good literature"; "the Irish have a penchant for blarney"
liking - a feeling of pleasure and enjoyment; "I've always had a liking for reading"; "she developed a liking for gin"
acquired taste - a preference that is only acquired after considerable experience; "martinis are an acquired taste"
weakness - a penchant for something even though it might not be good for you; "he has a weakness for chocolate"

predilection

predilection

noun
Translations
mieltymys

predilection

[ˌpriːdɪˈlekʃən] Npredilección f
to have a predilection fortener predilección por

predilection

[ˌpriːdɪˈlɛkʃən] n (= fondness) → prédilection f
to have a predilection for sth → avoir une prédilection pour qch

predilection

nVorliebe f, → Faible nt(for für)

predilection

[ˌpriːdɪˈlɛkʃn] npredilezione f
References in classic literature ?
It is said that the student likes to appear on the street and in other public places in this kind of array, and that this predilection often keeps him out when exposure to rain or sun is a positive danger for him.
All the monarchs of the Norman race had shown the most marked predilection for their Norman subjects; the laws of the chase, and many others equally unknown to the milder and more free spirit of the Saxon constitution, had been fixed upon the necks of the subjugated inhabitants, to add weight, as it were, to the feudal chains with which they were loaded.
The State governments will have the advantage of the Federal government, whether we compare them in respect to the immediate dependence of the one on the other; to the weight of personal influence which each side will possess; to the powers respectively vested in them; to the predilection and probable support of the people; to the disposition and faculty of resisting and frustrating the measures of each other.
Besides her predilection for the nobility, Mademoiselle Cormon had another and very excusable mania: that of being loved for herself.
Nor was this difficult, as she was soon to learn, for it rapidly became evident that beneath the uncouth savagery of the girl was a bed rock of innate refinement--a nicety of taste and predilection that quite equaled that of her instructor.
But man has such a predilection for systems and abstract deductions that he is ready to distort the truth intentionally, he is ready to deny the evidence of his senses only to justify his logic.
The king, however, who sought distraction, while traveling as fast as possible--for he was anxious to be in Paris by the twenty-third--stopped from time to time to fly the magpie, a pastime for which the taste had been formerly inspired in him by De Luynes, and for which he had always preserved a great predilection.
For passe I had always had a sort of predilection, yet I lost my stake upon it.
Knowing, therefore, his connection by marriage with that tribe, and his predilection for a residence among them, they would put no restraint upon his will, but, whenever they met with a party of that people, would leave him at liberty to remain among his adopted brethren.
To drive her from a place that in some sense belonged to her was not only to insult her, but to cause her a species of artistic pain; for all artists have a spot of predilection where they work.
But certain cows will show a fondness for a particular pair of hands, sometimes carrying this predilection so far as to refuse to stand at all except to their favourite, the pail of a stranger being unceremoniously kicked over.
His interest, after all, is, consistently, that of the moralist (in no narrow sense) who deals, from predilection, with the sort of literary work which stirs men--stirs their intellect-- through feeling; and with that literature, especially, as looked at through the means by which it became capable of thus commanding men.