predisposing


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Related to predisposing: predisposing factors

pre·dis·pose

 (prē′dĭ-spōz′)
v. pre·dis·posed, pre·dis·pos·ing, pre·dis·pos·es
v.tr.
1. To make (someone) inclined to something in advance: His good manners predispose people in his favor.
2. To make susceptible or liable: conditions that predispose miners to lung disease.
v.intr.
To provide an inclination or susceptibility: a genetic trait that predisposes to the development of cancer.
Translations

predisposing

adj predisponente
References in classic literature ?
However, we have discovered that there WAS a predisposing influence against you--and there is one uncertainty cleared out of our way, at any rate.
The aim of the study was to define the predisposing factors responsible for the occurrence of BPME, as well as the possible correlation between the presence of predisposing factors and patient demographic characteristics, etiology and outcome of the disease.
Necrotic enteritis in chickens develops as a result of infection with pathogenic strains of Clostridium perfringens and the presence of predisposing factors.
Medical students have to indulge in a lot of curricular near work, probably predisposing them to development of myopia.
While grooming, cats often ingest hair that is shed, sometimes predisposing them to hairballs, or trichobezoars, which may cause problems in some cats.
Age, sex, occupation, predisposing factors and examination findings of these cases were recorded.
We compared previously healthy patients with patients who had predisposing medical conditions in terms of demographic profile, clinical signs and symptoms and outcome, and known exposure factors.
That, by its nature, the conduct at issue causes harm or presents a significant risk of harm to individuals or society in a way that undermines or threatens to undermine a value reflected in and thus formally endorsed through the Constitution or similar fundamental laws by, for example: (a) confronting members of the public with conduct that significantly interferes with their autonomy and liberty; or (b) predisposing others to anti-social behaviour; or (c) physically or psychologically harming persons involved in the conduct, and 2.
Inappropriate nutritional status or exposure to environmental chemicals and the accompanied alteration in growth and endocrine homeostasis may permanently change the fetus's structure, physiology, and metabolism, thereby predisposing it to various diseases in later life including mammary cancer.
Odds of venous thromboembolism also were positively associated with current use of pills and having a family history of the disorder, as well as having experienced prolonged immobilization and having had a possible predisposing health problem (e.
So we should be careful in treating otitis externa with an antibacterial over the long term because we might be predisposing our patients to more trouble in the future.
Women who carry a genetic mutation predisposing them to breast cancer should rely on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) instead of mammography for their regular screenings, a new study suggests.