preelection


Related to preelection: re-covered

pre•e•lec•tion

or pre-e•lec•tion

(ˌpri ɪˈlɛk ʃən)

n.
1. a choice or selection made beforehand.
adj.
2. coming before an election: preelection promises.
[1890–95]
References in periodicals archive ?
recognition of the new state of Israel in 1948; laughing with Truman following the astonishing 1948 upset because certain "supporters" claimed their preelection endorsement letters had been lost in the mail.
Javed Iqbal said that the popularlyelected Prime Minister Mohammad Nawaz Shareefled regime has fulfilled a preelection commitment to the masses by deciding to reduce the prices of the petroleum products to a greater extent.
So while the Treasury pockets a preelection windfall, the taxpayer will still be paying for Royal Mail's PS12billion pension deficit.
Bosses said improvements in the core bank would see it return to financial health next year, paving the way for the Government to start offloading its 81% stake in what would come as a well-timed preelection boost.
Talking to reporters on the sidelines of the meet at Birla Planetarium, Nath said: " There are two kinds of coalitions, preelection and post- election.
On the contrary, all of this resembles a preelection atmosphere," Elezi said.
If the LDP, whose campaign platform included stronger defense and conservative nuclear energy policies, wins the election as suggested by preelection polls, it would put an end to the government led by Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda's DPJ and hawkish LDP chief Shinzo Abe will stage a comeback as prime minister.
Reminded of his Liberal Democrat party's preelection commitment to government support for the economy through the downturn, he said: "We have an industrial strategy.
Industry leaders say the move undermines David Cameron's preelection pledge to help seaside firms.
The bill cleared its House of Lords stage yesterday as part of the preelection wash-up period ahead of Monday''s dissolution of Parliament.
Cllr Bland said: "If the Lib- Dems take an extra two seats, they will still struggle to take a majority, but we have no preelection agreement.
Under bipartisan, preelection pressure for a significant re-examination of the president's war plan, the White House is walking a fine line.