preferable


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pref·er·a·ble

 (prĕf′ər-ə-bəl, prĕf′rə-)
adj.
More desirable or worthy than another; preferred: Coffee is preferable to tea, I think.

pref′er·a·bil′i·ty, pref′er·a·ble·ness n.
pref′er·a·bly adv.

preferable

(ˈprɛfərəbəl; ˈprɛfrəbəl) or

preferrable

adj
preferred or more desirable
ˌpreferaˈbility, ˈpreferableness n
Usage: Since preferable already means more desirable, one should not say something is more preferable or most preferable

pref•er•a•ble

(ˈprɛf ər ə bəl, ˈprɛf rə- or, often, prɪˈfɜr-)

adj.
1. more desirable.
2. worthy to be preferred.
[1640–50; < French préférable]
pref`er•a•bil′i•ty, n.
pref′er•a•bly, adv.

preferable

If one thing is preferable to another, it is more desirable or suitable than the other thing.

Knowledge is always preferable to ignorance.
Gradual change is preferable to sudden, large-scale change.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.preferable - more desirable than another; "coffee is preferable to tea"; "Danny's preferred name is `Dan'"
desirable - worth having or seeking or achieving; "a desirable job"; "computer with many desirable features"; "a desirable outcome"

preferable

adjective better, best, chosen, choice, preferred, recommended, favoured, superior, worthier, of choice, more suitable, more desirable, more eligible Resignation was the preferable option. Goat's milk yogurt is preferable.
undesirable, poor, average, fair, inferior, mediocre, second-rate, ineligible
Usage: Since preferable already means `more desirable', it is better when writing not to say something is more preferable or most preferable.

preferable

adjective
Of greater excellence than another:
Translations
vhodnější
bedre
kívánatosabb
ákjósanlegri
vhodnejší
tercih edilir/olunur

preferable

[ˈprefərəbl] ADJpreferible (to a)

preferable

[ˈprɛfərəbəl] adjpréférable
preferable to sth → préférable à qch
preferable to doing sth → préférable à faire qch
it is preferable to do sth → il est préférable de faire qch
It is preferable to use only olive oil → Il est préférable d'utiliser uniquement de l'huile d'olive.

preferable

adj X is preferable to YX ist Y (dat)vorzuziehen; anything would be preferable to sharing a flat with Sophiealles wäre besser, als mit Sophie zusammen wohnen zu müssen; death is preferable to dishonourlieber tot als ehrlos; it is preferable to use vegetable oil for cookingzum Kochen eignet sich pflanzliches Öl besser or am besten, zum Kochen ist pflanzliches Öl vorzuziehen; it would be preferable to do it that wayes wäre besser, es so zu machen; to find something preferableetw vorziehen, einer Sache (dat)den Vorzug geben; infinitely preferablehundertmal besser or lieber

preferable

[ˈprɛfrəbl] adjpreferibile

prefer

(priˈfəː) past tense, past participle preˈferred verb
to like better. Which do you prefer – tea or coffee?; I prefer reading to watching television; She would prefer to come with you rather than stay here.
ˈpreferable (ˈpre-) adjective
more desirable. Is it preferable to write or make a telephone call?
ˈpreferably adverb
ˈpreference (ˈpre-) noun
(a) choice of, or (a) liking for, one thing rather than another. He likes most music but he has a preference for classical music.

I prefer apples to (not than) oranges.
preferable, adjective, is spelt with -r-.
preference, noun, is spelt with -r-.
preferred and preferring are spelt with -rr-.

preferable

a. preferible, favorito-a.
References in classic literature ?
To be delivered into the hands of Sir William Johnson was far preferable to being led into the wilds of Canada; but in order to effect even the former, it would be necessary to traverse the forest for many weary leagues, each step of which was carrying him further from the scene of the war, and, consequently, from the post, not only of honor, but of duty.
Death was preferable to captivity; and if taken by storm, we must inevitably be devoted to destruction.
Instead of discussing her claim to rank among ladies, it would be preferable to regard Phoebe as the example of feminine grace and availability combined, in a state of society, if there were any such, where ladies did not exist.
Hester felt that the sacrifice of the clergyman's good name, and death itself, as she had already told Roger Chillingworth, would have been infinitely preferable to the alternative which she had taken upon herself to choose.
Mike Scully was very much worried over the opportunity which his last deal gave to them--the stockyards Democrats were furious at the idea of a rich capitalist for their candidate, and while they were changing they might possibly conclude that a Socialist firebrand was preferable to a Republican bum.
But water was preferable to fire, and still the stampede from the windows continued, and still the pitiless drenching assailed it until the building was empty; then the fireboys mounted to the hall and flooded it with water enough to annihilate forty times as much fire as there was there; for a village fire company does not often get a chance to show off, and so when it does get a chance, it makes the most of it.
Having already had more than a taste of them in the house of my old master, and having endured them there, I very naturally inferred my ability to endure them elsewhere, and especially at Baltimore; for I had something of the feeling about Baltimore that is expressed in the proverb, that "being hanged in England is preferable to dying a natural death in Ireland.
Indeed, when the time draws on, I shall decidedly recommend their bringing the barouchelandau; it will be so very much preferable.
Elinor had just been congratulating herself, in the midst of her perplexity, that however difficult it might be to express herself properly by letter, it was at least preferable to giving the information by word of mouth, when her visitor entered, to force her upon this greatest exertion of all.
After all, it is preferable to be hated than loved by him.
I hope your horse may think so too,' said my aunt; 'but at present he is holding down his head and his ears, standing before the door there, as if he thought his stable preferable.
He had not the usual resource of bigots in that superstitious period, most of whom were wont to atone for the crimes they were guilty of by liberality to the church, stupefying by this means their terrors by the idea of atonement and forgiveness; and although the refuge which success thus purchased, was no more like to the peace of mind which follows on sincere repentance, than the turbid stupefaction procured by opium resembles healthy and natural slumbers, it was still a state of mind preferable to the agonies of awakened remorse.