prefix

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prefix

Prefixes are morphemes (specific groups of letters with particular semantic meaning) that are added onto the beginning of roots and base words to change their meaning. Prefixes are one of the two predominant kinds of affixes—the other kind is suffixes, which come at the end of a root word.
Unlike suffixes, which can be either inflectional (changing only the grammatical function of a word without changing its basic meaning) or derivational (creating a word with an entirely new meaning), prefixes can only be derivational; adding a prefix always changes the basic meaning of the word.
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pre·fix

 (prē′fĭks′)
tr.v. pre·fixed, pre·fix·ing, pre·fix·es
1. To put or attach before or in front of.
2. (prē-fĭks′) To settle or arrange in advance.
3. Grammar
a. To add as a prefix.
b. To add a prefix to.
n.
1. Grammar An affix, such as dis- in disbelieve, attached to the front of a word to produce a derivative word or an inflected form.
2. A letter, word, abbreviation, or number placed before a name, address, or other identifying label to indicate class or category: You have to indicate on the form whether you prefer the prefix Mr., Ms., or Dr.

[Middle English prefixen, from Old French prefixer : pre-, before (from Latin prae-; see pre-) + fixer, to place (from Latin fīxus, past participle of fīgere, to fasten; see dhīgw- in Indo-European roots). N., from New Latin praefīxum, from neuter sing. of Latin praefīxus, past participle of praefīgere, to fix in front : prae-, pre- + fīgere, to fasten.]

pre′fix′al adj.
pre′fix′al·ly adv.
pre′fix·a′tion (-fĭk-sā′shən), pre·fix′ion (-fĭk′shən) n.

prefix

n
1. (Grammar) grammar an affix that precedes the stem to which it is attached, as for example un- in unhappy. Compare suffix1
2. something coming or placed before
vb (tr)
3. to put or place before
4. (Grammar) grammar to add (a morpheme) as a prefix to the beginning of a word
prefixal adj
ˈprefixally adv
prefixion n

pre•fix

(n. ˈpri fɪks; v. also priˈfɪks)

n.
1. an affix placed before a base or another prefix, as un- in unkind, un- and re- in unrewarding.
2. something prefixed, as a title before a person's name.
v.t.
3. to fix or put before or in front.
4. to add as a prefix.
5. to fix, settle, or appoint beforehand.
[1375–1425; (v.) late Middle English < Middle French prefixer < Latin praefixus, past participle of praefīgere to set up in front; see pre-, fix; (n.) < New Latin praefixum, neuter of praefixus]
pre•fix•al (ˈpri fɪk səl, priˈfɪk-) adj.
pre′fix•al•ly, adv.
pre`fix•a′tion, pre•fix′ion (-ˈfɪk ʃən) n.

prefix


Past participle: prefixed
Gerund: prefixing

Imperative
prefix
prefix
Present
I prefix
you prefix
he/she/it prefixes
we prefix
you prefix
they prefix
Preterite
I prefixed
you prefixed
he/she/it prefixed
we prefixed
you prefixed
they prefixed
Present Continuous
I am prefixing
you are prefixing
he/she/it is prefixing
we are prefixing
you are prefixing
they are prefixing
Present Perfect
I have prefixed
you have prefixed
he/she/it has prefixed
we have prefixed
you have prefixed
they have prefixed
Past Continuous
I was prefixing
you were prefixing
he/she/it was prefixing
we were prefixing
you were prefixing
they were prefixing
Past Perfect
I had prefixed
you had prefixed
he/she/it had prefixed
we had prefixed
you had prefixed
they had prefixed
Future
I will prefix
you will prefix
he/she/it will prefix
we will prefix
you will prefix
they will prefix
Future Perfect
I will have prefixed
you will have prefixed
he/she/it will have prefixed
we will have prefixed
you will have prefixed
they will have prefixed
Future Continuous
I will be prefixing
you will be prefixing
he/she/it will be prefixing
we will be prefixing
you will be prefixing
they will be prefixing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been prefixing
you have been prefixing
he/she/it has been prefixing
we have been prefixing
you have been prefixing
they have been prefixing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been prefixing
you will have been prefixing
he/she/it will have been prefixing
we will have been prefixing
you will have been prefixing
they will have been prefixing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been prefixing
you had been prefixing
he/she/it had been prefixing
we had been prefixing
you had been prefixing
they had been prefixing
Conditional
I would prefix
you would prefix
he/she/it would prefix
we would prefix
you would prefix
they would prefix
Past Conditional
I would have prefixed
you would have prefixed
he/she/it would have prefixed
we would have prefixed
you would have prefixed
they would have prefixed

prefix

A word or word part that is added to the beginning of another word, such as “dis-” in “dislike.”
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.prefix - an affix that is added in front of the word
affix - a linguistic element added to a word to produce an inflected or derived form
alpha privative - the negative prefix a- or un-
Verb1.prefix - attach a prefix to; "prefixed words"
affix - attach or become attached to a stem word; "grammatical morphemes affix to the stem"
suffix - attach a suffix to; "suffix words"
Translations
بادِئَه، مقْطَع يُضاف في أوَّل الكَلِمَه
předponaprefix
præfiksforstavelse
predmetakprefiks
elõképzõ
forskeyti
接頭辞
priešdėlis
priedēklis
predpona
predpona
ön ek

prefix

[ˈpriːfɪks]
A. N [of word] → prefijo m; [of phone number] → prefijo m
B. [priːˈfɪks] VT
1. (= introduce) → introducir
to prefix a statement withencabezar una declaración con ...
2. (Ling) → adjuntar un prefijo a

prefix

[ˈpriːfɪks] npréfixe m

prefix

n (Gram) → Vorsilbe f, → Präfix nt; (= title)Namensvorsatz m; (in code) → Vorsatz m; (Telec) → Vorwahl f
vt (Gram) → präfigieren, mit einer Vorsilbe or einem Präfix versehen; namemit einem Namensvorsatz versehen; number (with code) → voranstellen (+dat), → voransetzen (+dat); words prefixed by “un”Wörter mit der Vorsilbe or dem Präfix „un“

prefix

[ˈpriːfɪks] n (Gram) → prefisso

prefix

(ˈpriːfiks) noun
a syllable or syllables put at the beginning of another word to change its meaning. dislike; unemployed; remake; ineffective.

prefix

n. gr. prefijo.
References in periodicals archive ?
In general, the vowels of the prefixes of the basic stem in Semitic languages reflect two main vowel qualities, *i and *a.
The SC had issued a judgment on December 15, 1995, that national awards do not amount to ' titles' within the meaning of Article 18( 1) and they should not be used as suffixes or prefixes.
The CPUC has started the process to introduce a new area code to the area now served by the 916 area code, as the 916 is now expected to use up its available prefixes by March 2018 due to increased demand.
In Study 1, participants were taught 60 root words and four prefixes and increased their accurate definitions for untaught prefixed words.
Advanced web searching knowledge should include an understanding of how specific prefixes and operators work (and fail to work) and how they improve search results.
There are five alphabetic prefixes used to create unique PPI time series identifiers: WP, WD, PC, PD, and ND.
He considers the manner in which various Old English prefixes such as a- and ge-, which are no longer productive, were used in the past to express aspect when attached to verbs, for example astreccan and gegladian, a function performed by post-verbal particles in Present-Day English equivalents stretch out and cheer up.
BRPS proposed by Chang [18] uses a hierarchical list of sorted ranges and prefixes that allow the binary search to be performed on the list at each level to find the best matched rule, but there are still redundant rules in the search structure.
Some aspects of its meaning in verbs are discussed in studies related to (among other things) encoding motion events (Filipovic 2007), telicity (Novakov 2007), and the perfectivizing role of prefixes (Grickat 1966-1967).
This would require no publicity; once the prefixes are in use folk will ask what they mean.
These are two prefixes that go in front of medical terms and, despite sounding similar, mean the opposite of each other.
Through their pronominal prefixes, often hidden within them, Seneca words convey the following types of information regarding the participants in events and states: