progesterone

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Related to pregnancy hormone: hCG diet

pro·ges·ter·one

 (prō-jĕs′tə-rōn′)
n.
1. A steroid hormone, C21H30O2, that is secreted by the corpus luteum of the ovary and by the placenta and that acts to prepare the uterus for implantation of the fertilized ovum and to maintain pregnancy.
2. This compound formulated as a drug, usually prepared synthetically from phytosterols, used in the treatment of infertility, amenorrhea, abnormal uterine bleeding, and certain other conditions.

[pro- + gest(ation) + (st)er(ol) + -one.]

progesterone

(prəʊˈdʒɛstəˌrəʊn)
n
(Biochemistry) a steroid hormone, secreted mainly by the corpus luteum in the ovary, that prepares and maintains the uterus for pregnancy. Formula: C21H30O2. Also called: corpus luteum hormone
[C20: from pro-1 + ge(station) + ster(ol) + -one]

pro•ges•ter•one

(proʊˈdʒɛs təˌroʊn)

n.
a female hormone, synthesized chiefly in the corpus luteum of the ovary, that functions in the menstrual cycle to prepare the lining of the uterus for a fertilized ovum.
[1930–35;b. progestin and luteosterone(< German; synonymous with progestin)]

pro·ges·ter·one

(prō-jĕs′tə-rōn′)
A steroid hormone that prepares the uterus for pregnancy, maintains pregnancy, and promotes development of the mammary glands. The main sources of progesterone are the ovary and the placenta.

progesterone

A hormone that helps prepare the uterus to receive a fertilized egg.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.progesterone - a steroid hormone (trade name Lipo-Lutin) produced in the ovary; prepares and maintains the uterus for pregnancy
anovulant, anovulatory drug, birth control pill, contraceptive pill, oral contraceptive, oral contraceptive pill, pill - a contraceptive in the form of a pill containing estrogen and progestin to inhibit ovulation and so prevent conception
progestin, progestogen - any of a group of steroid hormones that have the effect of progesterone
Translations
progesteron

progesterone

[prəʊˈdʒestərəʊn] Nprogesterona f

progesterone

[prəʊˈdʒɛstərəʊn] nprogestérone f

progesterone

nProgesteron nt, → Gelbkörperhormon nt

progesterone

[prəʊˈdʒɛstəˌrəʊn] nprogesterone m

pro·ges·ter·one

n. progesterona, hormona esteroide segregada por los ovarios.

progesterone

n progesterona
References in periodicals archive ?
It is thought to be caused by elevated levels of pregnancy hormone HCG, which occur after conception and can lead to severe dehydration.
Diagnosis is based on levels of a pregnancy hormone called HCG (human chorionic gonadotrophin).
First Response Early Pregnancy Test is so sensitive that most pregnant women have enough of the pregnancy hormone, hCG (human chorionic gonadotropin), to be detected as early as 6 days before your missed period, and a day before other tests.
Clearview 25 hCG Combo and Clearview hCG Combo II one-step tests are used for the early detection of the pregnancy hormone, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG).
A blood test will be done for the presence of the pregnancy hormone, Human Chorionic Gonadotropin (hCG).
The research team examined the effect that the anti-cancer drug Trichostatin A - better known as TSA - had on the levels of receptors on human smooth muscle cells of the womb, or uterus, that are affected by the pregnancy hormone hCG (human chorionic gonadotrophin).
Take encouragement from the fact that pregnancy hormone changes which spark morning sickness are a good signal that the foetus is very securely embedded in the womb.
It is the natural pregnancy hormone, but during pregnancy the levels double every two days.
First Response(TM) Early Result Pregnancy Test can be used earlier than any other test on the market to detect the pregnancy hormone hCG.
But her research has revealed that by looking at the amount of bleeding and the levels of the pregnancy hormone, human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG), doctors could accurately predict the outcome.
Reserarchers for the study, presented at the European Society for Human Reproduction and Embryology conference in Stockholm this week, found six factors with the greatest impact on miscarriages, levels of progesterone and of the pregnancy hormone human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), fetus length, the extent of bleeding, and the baby's development.
IT is important for women who experience a molar pregnancy to be tested for raised levels of the pregnancy hormone HCG (human chorionic gonadotrophin) because one in five to one in 10 women with a complete mole and one in 200 with a partial mole can go on to develop cancer.