preheminence

preheminence

(prɪˈhɛmɪnəns)
n
an archaic spelling of pre-eminence
References in periodicals archive ?
For everie Englishman is entended to bee there present, either in person or by procuration and attornies, of what preheminence, state, dignitie, or qualities soever he be, from the Prince (be he King or Queen) to the lowest person of Englande (2).
When every Ballad-monger boldly writes : And windy froth of bottle-ale doth fill Their purest organ of invention: Yet all applauded and puft up with pryde, Swell in conceit, and load the Stage with stuffe, Rakt from the rotten imbers of stall jests : Which basest lines best please the vulgar sence Make truest rapture lose preheminence.
13) Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa von Nettesheim, The Glory of Women: or, A Treatise Declaring the Excellency and Preheminence of Women above Men which is proved both by Scripture, Law, Reason and Authority, Divine and Humane.
Livy's account also clearly emphasizes Coriolanus's desire to humble the plebeians and curb their growing power while dealing with the corn crisis: "'If they will (quoth hee) have their corne and victuals at the old price, let them restore unto the Senatours their auncient right and preheminence.
In 1643 leading New England ministers had emphasized that neither ruling nor preaching elders were to "strive for authority or preheminence one above another.
His midrash follows the sentence: "But for the Moral Part, perhaps Youth will have the preheminence (sic), as Age hath for the Politique.