prehuman

Related to prehuman: Neanderthal, Australopithecus

pre·hu·man

 (prē-hyo͞o′mən)
n.
Any of various extinct primates, especially an early hominin.
adj.
1. Of or relating to these extinct primates.
2. Of or relating to a period preceding settlement by humans: New Zealand's prehuman avifauna.

prehuman

(priːˈhjuːmən)
n
(Anthropology & Ethnology) an evolutionary ancestor of mankind
adj
1. (Anthropology & Ethnology) denoting the evolutionary period before the appearance of mankind
2. (Anthropology & Ethnology) relating to an evolutionary ancestor of mankind

pre•hu•man

(priˈhyu mən; often -ˈyu-)

adj.
1. preceding the appearance or existence of human beings.
2. of or pertaining to a human prototype.
n.
3. a prehuman animal.
[1835–45]
References in classic literature ?
These germs of disease have taken toll of humanity since the beginning of things--taken toll of our prehuman ancestors since life began here.
Since ecological change is inevitable, Thomas urges us to throw aside static notions of restoring local ecosystems to some imagined prehuman Edenic state.
And if we are not to return to that almost prehuman condition, the advocates of liberty must understand what they have to conserve.
The first part of the book ranges widely over typical big history topics: big bang cosmology, the origins of our universe and planet, the evolution of life on Earth, prehuman and human ancestors, and ancient myths of origins.
This indestructible prehuman rhythm is the only visible journey of the Invisible on this earth.
Our research shows how little we know of Australia's immediate prehuman avifauna," researcher Trevor Worthy said.
See, for example, Andrew Reeve, Property (Atlantic Highlands, NJ: Humanities Press International, 1986), 51-57; and Francis Fukuyama, The Origins of Political Order: From Prehuman Times to the French Revolution (New York: Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, 2011), chaps.
14) And large numbers even allowed him to rest easy in the idea of the prehuman and post-human: "To be in any form, what is that?
Lucy, an ambassador of a prehuman species called Australopithecus afarensis, must have accidentally plunged from a tree while climbing or sleeping, the scientists propose online August 29 in Nature.
Yet, these glimpses--the satellite imaging of the earth's atmosphere, the prehuman atmospheres found in ice cores, the atmospheres modeled computationally as dynamical systems by Lorenz--these fail to register with culturally and politically authoritative actors.
Efficient endurance running played a vital role in the survival of early man, and researchers have identified numerous physical and physiologic adaptations of prehuman ancestors and early humans that specifically promoted bipedal endurance running.
Species are disappearing 1,000 times faster than in prehuman times.