prehuman

(redirected from prehumans)

pre·hu·man

 (prē-hyo͞o′mən)
n.
Any of various extinct primates, especially an early hominin.
adj.
1. Of or relating to these extinct primates.
2. Of or relating to a period preceding settlement by humans: New Zealand's prehuman avifauna.

prehuman

(priːˈhjuːmən)
n
(Anthropology & Ethnology) an evolutionary ancestor of mankind
adj
1. (Anthropology & Ethnology) denoting the evolutionary period before the appearance of mankind
2. (Anthropology & Ethnology) relating to an evolutionary ancestor of mankind

pre•hu•man

(priˈhyu mən; often -ˈyu-)

adj.
1. preceding the appearance or existence of human beings.
2. of or pertaining to a human prototype.
n.
3. a prehuman animal.
[1835–45]
References in periodicals archive ?
He covers the prehumans, the humans, chronicle, autobiography, Lucy the fossil, and Lucy the symbol.
According to Dunbar, as a result of natural selection, prehumans eventually developed early language skills to manage their large group social bonding issues better.
Some primatologists and anthropologists, most notably Robin Dunbar, speculate that the brain size of our prehuman forbears literally doubled about two million years ago when they began living in larger and larger communities.
77 million years provide a missing link between ape-like prehumans and modern man.
In this book about the emergence of humankind, the author states: "This book was inspired by discoveries of the oldest fossilized remains of humans and prehumans ever found, discoveries made in Africa.
For most of our history as humans and all of our history as prehumans, our ancestors lived in small groups probably no more than 100 individuals.
Then they describe the collection of subsequent data at the site and follow our modern-clay understanding of Homo erectus, The research reveals that these prehumans endured a brutal existence ruled by hunger and enforced by clubs.
Rather prehumans emerged in a number of different lines.
Hoberg's team did DNA studies that gave more evidence for the idea that prehumans acquired these tapeworms before cattle and swine were domesticated about 10,000 years ago.
Prehumans experienced the fact that the sounds they made had effects.