prejudice


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Related to prejudice: Without prejudice

prej·u·dice

 (prĕj′ə-dĭs)
n.
1.
a. The act or state of holding unreasonable preconceived judgments or convictions: "This is not actually a volume of the best short stories ... These are just the stories that I like best, and I am full of prejudice and strong opinions" (Ann Patchett).
b. An adverse judgment or opinion formed unfairly or without knowledge of the facts: a boy with a prejudice against unfamiliar foods.
2. Irrational suspicion or hatred of a particular social group, such as a race or the adherents of a religion.
3.
a. Detriment or harm caused to a person, especially in a legal case: The delay operated to her prejudice.
b. Preclusionary effect, preventing further pursuit of one's interests: The case was dismissed with prejudice.
tr.v. prej·u·diced, prej·u·dic·ing, prej·u·dic·es
1. To fill with prejudice or cause to judge with prejudice. See Synonyms at bias.
2. To affect detrimentally or harmfully by a judgment or act.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin praeiūdicium : prae-, pre- + iūdicium, judgment (from iūdex, iūdic-, judge; see deik- in Indo-European roots).]

prejudice

(ˈprɛdʒʊdɪs)
n
1. an opinion formed beforehand, esp an unfavourable one based on inadequate facts
2. the act or condition of holding such opinions
3. intolerance of or dislike for people of a specific race, religion, etc
4. disadvantage or injury resulting from prejudice
5. to the prejudice of to the detriment of
6. (Law) without prejudice law without dismissing or detracting from an existing right or claim
vb (tr)
7. to cause to be prejudiced
8. to disadvantage or injure by prejudice
[C13: from Old French préjudice, from Latin praejūdicium a preceding judgment, disadvantage, from prae before + jūdicium trial, sentence, from jūdex a judge]

prej•u•dice

(ˈprɛdʒ ə dɪs)

n., v. -diced, -dic•ing. n.
1. an unfavorable opinion or feeling formed beforehand or without knowledge, thought, or reason.
2. any preconceived opinion or feeling, either favorable or unfavorable.
3. unreasonable feelings, opinions, or attitudes, esp. of a hostile nature, regarding a racial, religious, or national group.
4. such attitudes considered collectively: The war against prejudice is never-ending.
5. damage or injury; detriment: a law that operated to the prejudice of the majority.
v.t.
6. to affect with a prejudice.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Old French < Latin praejūdicium prejudgment, orig. preliminary or previous judicial inquiry]
syn: See bias.

prejudice

- Originally meant harm or injury caused to a person resulting from a disregard for their rights; it is from Latin, meaning "to judge beforehand."
See also related terms for rights.

Prejudice

 

(See also PREFERENCE, RACISM.)

a jaundiced eye A prejudiced perspective or point of view; a skeptical, critical attitude; distorted vision that perceives everything as faulty, inferior, or undesirable. The disease of jaundice gives a yellowish cast to the whites of the eyes. This phrase is based on the assumption that everything appears “yellow”—i.e., negative, distorted—to such eyes.

All seems infected that the infected spy,
As all looks yellow to the jaundiced eye.
(Alexander Pope, An Essay on Criticism, 1709)

look through blue glasses To see things in a preconceived, usually distorted light; to be biased, to be unable to see things for what they are. This expression plays on the negative connotations often carried by the color “blue.” The image of spectacles gives tangible form to the nonmaterial prejudice which colors one’s perceptions.

nothing like leather An expression mocking one who has a chauvinistic attitude toward his own craft or field. Attributed to an Aesop fable, nothing like leather was popularized by the following anonymous verse which explains its origin.

A town feared a siege, and held consultation
Which was the best method of fortification;
A grave, skilful mason said in his opinion
Nothing but stone could secure the dominion.
A carpenter said, “Though that was well spoke,
It was better by far to defend it with oak.”
A currier, wiser than both these together,
Said, “Try what you please, there’s nothing like leather.”

prejudice


Past participle: prejudiced
Gerund: prejudicing

Imperative
prejudice
prejudice
Present
I prejudice
you prejudice
he/she/it prejudices
we prejudice
you prejudice
they prejudice
Preterite
I prejudiced
you prejudiced
he/she/it prejudiced
we prejudiced
you prejudiced
they prejudiced
Present Continuous
I am prejudicing
you are prejudicing
he/she/it is prejudicing
we are prejudicing
you are prejudicing
they are prejudicing
Present Perfect
I have prejudiced
you have prejudiced
he/she/it has prejudiced
we have prejudiced
you have prejudiced
they have prejudiced
Past Continuous
I was prejudicing
you were prejudicing
he/she/it was prejudicing
we were prejudicing
you were prejudicing
they were prejudicing
Past Perfect
I had prejudiced
you had prejudiced
he/she/it had prejudiced
we had prejudiced
you had prejudiced
they had prejudiced
Future
I will prejudice
you will prejudice
he/she/it will prejudice
we will prejudice
you will prejudice
they will prejudice
Future Perfect
I will have prejudiced
you will have prejudiced
he/she/it will have prejudiced
we will have prejudiced
you will have prejudiced
they will have prejudiced
Future Continuous
I will be prejudicing
you will be prejudicing
he/she/it will be prejudicing
we will be prejudicing
you will be prejudicing
they will be prejudicing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been prejudicing
you have been prejudicing
he/she/it has been prejudicing
we have been prejudicing
you have been prejudicing
they have been prejudicing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been prejudicing
you will have been prejudicing
he/she/it will have been prejudicing
we will have been prejudicing
you will have been prejudicing
they will have been prejudicing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been prejudicing
you had been prejudicing
he/she/it had been prejudicing
we had been prejudicing
you had been prejudicing
they had been prejudicing
Conditional
I would prejudice
you would prejudice
he/she/it would prejudice
we would prejudice
you would prejudice
they would prejudice
Past Conditional
I would have prejudiced
you would have prejudiced
he/she/it would have prejudiced
we would have prejudiced
you would have prejudiced
they would have prejudiced
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.prejudice - a partiality that prevents objective consideration of an issue or situation
taboo, tabu - a prejudice (especially in Polynesia and other South Pacific islands) that prohibits the use or mention of something because of its sacred nature
irrational hostility - extreme prejudice
partisanship, partiality - an inclination to favor one group or view or opinion over alternatives
experimenter bias - (psychology) bias introduced by an experimenter whose expectations about the outcome of the experiment can be subtly communicated to the participants in the experiment
homophobia - prejudice against (fear or dislike of) homosexual people and homosexuality
Islamophobia - prejudice against Muslims; "Muslim intellectuals are afraid of growing Islamophobia in the West"
racism - the prejudice that members of one race are intrinsically superior to members of other races
tendentiousness - an intentional and controversial bias
Verb1.prejudice - disadvantage by prejudice
justice - judgment involved in the determination of rights and the assignment of rewards and punishments
disadvantage, disfavor, disfavour - put at a disadvantage; hinder, harm; "This rule clearly disadvantages me"
2.prejudice - influence (somebody's) opinion in advance
bias, predetermine - cause to be biased
bias - influence in an unfair way; "you are biasing my choice by telling me yours"
act upon, influence, work - have and exert influence or effect; "The artist's work influenced the young painter"; "She worked on her friends to support the political candidate"

prejudice

noun
2. bias, preconception, partiality, preconceived notion, warp, jaundiced eye, prejudgment the male prejudices which Dr Greer identifies
3. harm, damage, hurt, disadvantage, loss, mischief, detriment, impairment I feel sure it can be done without prejudice to anybody's principles.
verb
1. bias, influence, colour, poison, distort, sway, warp, slant, predispose, jaundice, prepossess I think your upbringing has prejudiced you.
2. harm, damage, hurt, injure, mar, undermine, spoil, impair, hinder He claimed that the media coverage had prejudiced his chance of a fair trial.
Quotations
"Drive out prejudices through the door, and they will return through the window" [Frederick the Great letter to Voltaire]

prejudice

noun
1. An inclination for or against that inhibits impartial judgment:
2. Irrational suspicion or hatred of a particular group, race, or religion:
verb
1. To cause to have a prejudiced view:
2. To spoil the soundness or perfection of:
Translations
إجْحَافتَحَيُّز، مُحاباه، تَحامُليُجْحِف في حَق، يَضُريَجْعَلُه متَحَيِّزا أو مُتحاملا
předsudekuškoditnepříznivě ovlivnit
fordomforudindtagethedgøre én forudindtagetindgive fordommeødelægge
ennakkoluulovaarantaavahingoittaa
predrasuda
elfogultságelfogulttá teszelõítéletelőítéletkárosan befolyásol
fordómargera e-n hlutdræganskaîa, spilla
偏見
편견
iš anksto nuteiktiišankstinis nusistatymasprietarasprietaringas
aizspriedumskaitētradīt aizspriedumustraucēt
nepriaznivo ovplyvniťpredsudok
predsodek
fördom
อคติ
olumsuz yönde etkilemekön yargıönyargızarar vermek
định kiến

prejudice

[ˈpredʒʊdɪs]
A. N
1. (= biased opinion) → prejuicio m
there's a lot of racial prejudicehay muchos prejuicios raciales
prejudice against women is widespreadlos prejuicios machistas son moneda corriente
to have a prejudice against/in favour of sth/sbestar predispuesto en contra de/a favor de algo/algn
we all have our prejudicestodos tenemos nuestros prejuicios
he is quite without prejudice in this mattersobre esto no tiene ningún prejuicio
2. (Jur) (= injury, detriment) → perjuicio m
to the prejudice ofcon perjuicio de, con menoscabo de
without prejudice (Jur) → sin detrimento de sus propios derechos
without prejudice tosin perjuicio de
B. VT
1. (= bias) → predisponer, prevenir (against contra)
2. (= damage) → perjudicar
to prejudice one's chancesperjudicar sus posibilidades

prejudice

[ˈprɛdʒʊdɪs]
n
(= bias) → préjugé m
That's just a prejudice → C'est juste un préjugé.
He had encountered a lot of prejudice → Il s'est heurté à beaucoup de préjugés.
racial prejudice → préjugés raciaux
prejudice against sb → les préjugés contre qn
prejudice against women → les préjugés contre les femmes
prejudice in favour of sb → le préjugé en faveur de qn
(= harm) → préjudice m
without prejudice to → sans préjudice de
vt
(= influence) [+ person, jury, trial] → influencer
to prejudice sb against → prévenir qn contre
to prejudice sb in favour of → prévenir qn en faveur de
(= put at risk) [+ health, application, enjoyment] → porter préjudice à
to prejudice sb's chances → nuire aux chances de qn

prejudice

n
(= biased opinion)Vorurteil nt; his prejudice against …seine Voreingenommenheit gegen …; that’s pure prejudicedas ist reine Voreingenommenheit; the newspaper report was full of prejudice against …der Zeitungsbericht steckte voller Vorurteile gegen …; to have a prejudice against somebody/somethingein Vorurteil ntgegen jdn/etw haben, gegen jdn/etw voreingenommen sein; racial prejudiceRassenvorurteile pl; colour prejudiceVorurteile plgegen Andersfarbige or aufgrund or auf Grund der Hautfarbe
(esp Jur: = detriment, injury) → Schaden m; to the prejudice of somebody (form)zu jds Schaden; to the prejudice of something (form)unter Beeinträchtigung einer Sache (gen); without prejudice (Jur) → ohne Verbindlichkeit or Obligo; without prejudice to one’s rightsohne sich (dat)selbst zu schaden; without prejudice to any claim (Jur) → ohne Beeinträchtigung or unbeschadet irgendwelcher Ansprüche
vt
(= bias)einnehmen, beeinflussen ? also prejudiced
(= injure)gefährden; chancesbeeinträchtigen, gefährden

prejudice

[ˈprɛdʒʊdɪs]
1. n
a. (biased opinion) → pregiudizio collective npregiudizi mpl
his prejudice against sb/sth → i suoi pregiudizi nei riguardi di qn/qc
b. (Law) (injury, detriment) → pregiudizio
without prejudice to (frm) → senza pregiudicare
2. vt
a. (bias) to prejudice sb in favour of/againstdisporre bene/male qn verso
b. (frm) (injure) → pregiudicare, ledere, compromettere

prejudice

(ˈpredʒədis) noun
(an) opinion or feeling for or especially against something, formed unfairly or unreasonably ie without proper knowledge. The jury must listen to his statement without prejudice; Is racial prejudice (= dislike of people because of their race) increasing in this country?
verb
1. to cause to feel prejudice for or against something.
2. to harm or endanger (a person's position, prospects etc) in some way. Your terrible handwriting will prejudice your chances of passing the exam.
ˈprejudiced adjective
having or showing prejudice. a prejudiced attitude to people of other races; Don't be so prejudiced.

prejudice

إجْحَاف předsudek fordom Vorurteil προκατάληψη prejuicio ennakkoluulo préjugé predrasuda pregiudizio 偏見 편견 vooroordeel fordom uprzedzenie preconceito предубеждение fördom อคติ önyargı định kiến 偏见

prejudice

n. prejuicio, juicio preconcebido.
References in classic literature ?
The hospitable Americans had invited every acquaintance they had in Nice, and having no prejudice against titles, secured a few to add luster to their Christmas ball.
You've no prejudice against hot biscuit for supper?
The bird that would soar above the level plain of tradition and prejudice must have strong wings.
Heaven protect me from a prejudice so unworthy of my reason
They may love other individuals far better than their relatives,--they may even cherish dislike, or positive hatred, to the latter; but yet, in view of death, the strong prejudice of propinquity revives, and impels the testator to send down his estate in the line marked out by custom so immemorial that it looks like nature.
The people, in the case of which we speak, could justify its prejudice against Roger Chillingworth by no fact or argument worthy of serious refutation.
If I fail tonight, I can only try tomorrow; knowing that the fault must be mine--that if once the vision of my soul were spoken upon earth, if once the anguish of its defeat were uttered in human speech, it would break the stoutest barriers of prejudice, it would shake the most sluggish soul to action
The trader had arrived at that stage of Christian and political perfection which has been recommended by some preachers and politicians of the north, lately, in which he had completely overcome every humane weakness and prejudice.
I have a prejudice against people who print things in a foreign language and add no translation.
Prejudice or no prejudice, Pudd'nhead, I don't like them, and when they get their deserts you're not going to find me sitting on the mourner's bench.
Her prejudice against the minister had relaxed under his genial talk and presence, but feeling that Mrs.
DOUGLASS could be persuaded to conse- crate his time and talents to the promotion of the anti-slavery enterprise, a powerful impetus would be given to it, and a stunning blow at the same time inflicted on northern prejudice against a colored complexion.