prelate

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prel·ate

 (prĕl′ĭt)
n.
A high-ranking member of the clergy, especially a bishop.

[Middle English prelat, from Old French, from Medieval Latin praelātus, from Latin, past participle of praeferre, to carry before, to prefer : prae-, pre- + lātus, brought; see telə- in Indo-European roots.]

pre·lat′ic (prĭ-lăt′ĭk) adj.

prelate

(ˈprɛlɪt)
n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) a Church dignitary of high rank, such as a cardinal, bishop, or abbot
[C13: from Old French prélat, from Church Latin praelātus, from Latin praeferre to hold in special esteem, prefer]
prelatic, preˈlatical adj

prel•ate

(ˈprɛl ɪt)

n.
an ecclesiastic of a high order, as an archbishop or a bishop; a church dignitary.
[1175–1225; Middle English prelat < Medieval Latin praelātus, Latin: a dignitary, n. use of past participle of praeferre to give precedence to, prefer]
prel′ate•ship`, n.
pre•lat•ic (prɪˈlæt ɪk) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.prelate - a senior clergyman and dignitaryprelate - a senior clergyman and dignitary  
priest - a clergyman in Christian churches who has the authority to perform or administer various religious rites; one of the Holy Orders
Translations

prelate

[ˈprelɪt] Nprelado m

prelate

[ˈprɛlət] nprélat m

prelate

nPrälat m

prelate

[ˈprɛlɪt] nprelato
References in periodicals archive ?
Por esas fechas, con una Inglaterra en ambiente de pre-guerra civil, Milton escribio varios tratados vehementes en contra de las jerarquias de la Iglesia Anglicana y en defensa de la moral; entre estas obras destacan Of Reformation Touching Church Discipline in England (1641) y Of Prelatical Episcopacy y The Reason of Church-Government Urged against Prelaty.
He spoke out fiercely in parliament against Danby's plans to establish what he termed the "monstrum horrendum" of a prelatical "oligarchy," (28) and was listed as "thrice worthy," along with Rochester, in one of the rosters Shaftesbury compiled of members of parliament who could be relied on to vote for Exclusion.
When he titled one of his pamphlets Of Prelatical Episcopacy, his point was that "prelatical episcopacy" is an oxymoron, not a tautology.
degrees; that the pretext for Milton's famously being "Church-outed" pertained to the fact that prelatical "tyranny had invaded the Church" (CPW I.
The antiprelatical tracts--which include Of Reformation (1641), Of Prelatical Episcopacy (1641), Animadversions (1641), and The Reason of Church Government Urged Against Prelaty (1641-42)--attack the residually-Catholic ceremonialism and episcopal hierarchy of the Stuart church under Archbishop Laud.