prelingually deaf

prelingually deaf

(priːˈlɪŋɡwəlɪ)
adj
(Pathology)
a. deaf from birth or having acquired deafness before learning to speak
b. (as collective noun; preceded by the): the prelingually deaf.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Most prelingually deaf adults--those who were born deaf or who lost their hearing prior to age two when language was acquired--cannot speech-read more than five percent of a conversation, and deaf adults who leave high school on average can only read at a fourth-grade level (Vernon and Andrews, 1990; Andrews ct aL, 2004).
Those who are prelingually deaf often use American Sign Language (ASL) as their main mode of communication, which can constitute a barrier to being involved and knowledgeable about one's health care.
1995, An evaluation of the reading comprehension of students in Victoria who are profoundly, prelingually deaf and of an intervention programme to improve their inferential reading comprehension skills, PhD thesis, University of Melbourne.
In stage 1 I selected one prelingually deaf bilingual individual who translated the scale items into ASL.
The remaining 280,000 (1%) are prelingually deaf or have lost their hearing before the age of 18 (National Center for Health Statistics, 1994).
The author studied the interaction of three deaf and three hearing children with their prelingually deaf mothers during the first years of acquisition of both the sign language of The Netherlands (SLN) and Dutch.
O'Donoghue, MD, and his colleagues from University Hospital in Nottingham, England, write, "The results clearly show that young congenital and prelingually deaf children can develop substantial speech-perception abilities up to five years after implantation.
The second caution is that educators must not take prelingually deaf children's knowledge of ASL for granted because they use it every day.
A prelingually deaf child-one whose hearing loss was present at birth or occurred prior to any speech and language development (Moores, 1987, p.
What is particularly reprehensible in this case is that Advance Bionics, which has been entrusted with assisting young children and later-deafened or prelingually deaf adults, may have violated that trust by allowing the use of defective devices which may cause irreparable harm to the cochlear nerve and prevent later successful use of a cochlear implant," said Teresa Curtin, an attorney with Weitz & Luxenberg P.
Letting the deaf be deaf: Reconsidering the use of cochlear implants in prelingually deaf children.