prelude


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prel·ude

 (prĕl′yo͞od′, prā′lo͞od′, prē′-)
n.
1. An introductory performance, event, or action preceding a more important one; a preliminary or preface.
2. Music
a. A piece or movement that serves as an introduction to another section or composition and establishes the key, such as one that precedes a fugue, opens a suite, or precedes a church service.
b. A similar but independent composition for the piano.
c. The overture to an oratorio, opera, or act of an opera.
d. A short composition of the 1400s and early 1500s written in a free style, usually for keyboard.
v. prel·ud·ed, prel·ud·ing, prel·udes
v.tr.
1. To serve as a prelude to.
2. To introduce with or as if with a prelude.
v.intr.
To serve as a prelude or introduction.

[Medieval Latin praelūdium, from Latin praelūdere, to play beforehand : prae-, pre- + lūdere, to play; see leid- in Indo-European roots.]

prel′ud′er n.
pre·lu′di·al (prĭ-lo͞o′dē-əl) adj.

prelude

(ˈprɛljuːd)
n
1. (Music, other)
a. a piece of music that precedes a fugue, or forms the first movement of a suite, or an introduction to an act in an opera, etc
b. (esp for piano) a self-contained piece of music
2. something serving as an introduction or preceding event, occurrence, etc
vb
3. to serve as a prelude to (something)
4. (tr) to introduce by a prelude
[C16: (n) from Medieval Latin praelūdium, from prae before + -lūdium entertainment, from Latin lūdus play; (vb) from Late Latin praelūdere to play beforehand, rehearse, from lūdere to play]
preluder n
preˈludial adj
prelusion n
prelusive, prelusory adj
preˈlusively, preˈlusorily adv

prel•ude

(ˈprɛl yud, ˈpreɪl-, ˈpreɪ lud, ˈpri-)

n., v. -ud•ed, -ud•ing. n.
1. a preliminary to an action, event, condition, or work of broader scope and higher importance.
2. any action, event, comment, etc., that precedes something else.
3. Music.
a. a relatively short, independent instrumental composition, free in form and resembling an improvisation.
b. a piece that is introductory to another piece, as a fugue.
c. the overture to an opera.
d. music opening a church service; an introductory voluntary.
v.t.
4. to serve as a prelude or introduction to.
5. to introduce by a prelude.
6. to play as a prelude.
v.i.
7. to serve as a prelude.
8. to give a prelude.
9. to play a prelude.
[1555–65; < Medieval Latin praelūdium= Latin praelūd(ere) to compose a prelude (prae- pre- + lūdere to write for amusement, play) + -ium -ium1]

prelude


Past participle: preluded
Gerund: preluding

Imperative
prelude
prelude
Present
I prelude
you prelude
he/she/it preludes
we prelude
you prelude
they prelude
Preterite
I preluded
you preluded
he/she/it preluded
we preluded
you preluded
they preluded
Present Continuous
I am preluding
you are preluding
he/she/it is preluding
we are preluding
you are preluding
they are preluding
Present Perfect
I have preluded
you have preluded
he/she/it has preluded
we have preluded
you have preluded
they have preluded
Past Continuous
I was preluding
you were preluding
he/she/it was preluding
we were preluding
you were preluding
they were preluding
Past Perfect
I had preluded
you had preluded
he/she/it had preluded
we had preluded
you had preluded
they had preluded
Future
I will prelude
you will prelude
he/she/it will prelude
we will prelude
you will prelude
they will prelude
Future Perfect
I will have preluded
you will have preluded
he/she/it will have preluded
we will have preluded
you will have preluded
they will have preluded
Future Continuous
I will be preluding
you will be preluding
he/she/it will be preluding
we will be preluding
you will be preluding
they will be preluding
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been preluding
you have been preluding
he/she/it has been preluding
we have been preluding
you have been preluding
they have been preluding
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been preluding
you will have been preluding
he/she/it will have been preluding
we will have been preluding
you will have been preluding
they will have been preluding
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been preluding
you had been preluding
he/she/it had been preluding
we had been preluding
you had been preluding
they had been preluding
Conditional
I would prelude
you would prelude
he/she/it would prelude
we would prelude
you would prelude
they would prelude
Past Conditional
I would have preluded
you would have preluded
he/she/it would have preluded
we would have preluded
you would have preluded
they would have preluded
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.prelude - something that serves as a preceding event or introduces what follows; "training is a necessary preliminary to employment"; "drinks were the overture to dinner"
inception, origination, origin - an event that is a beginning; a first part or stage of subsequent events
2.prelude - music that precedes a fugue or introduces an act in an opera
music - an artistic form of auditory communication incorporating instrumental or vocal tones in a structured and continuous manner
chorale prelude - a composition for organ using a chorale as a basis for variations
Verb1.prelude - serve as a prelude or opening to
serve, function - serve a purpose, role, or function; "The tree stump serves as a table"; "The female students served as a control group"; "This table would serve very well"; "His freedom served him well"; "The table functions as a desk"
2.prelude - play as a prelude
music - musical activity (singing or whistling etc.); "his music was his central interest"
spiel, play - replay (as a melody); "Play it again, Sam"; "She played the third movement very beautifully"

prelude

noun
1. introduction, beginning, preparation, preliminary, start, commencement, curtain-raiser The protests are now seen as the prelude to last year's uprising.
2. overture, opening, introduction, introductory movement the third-act Prelude of Parsifal

prelude

noun
A short section of preliminary remarks:
Translations
تَمْهيد، مُقَدِّمَهمُقَدِّمَه موسيقيَّه
preludi
předehrapreludiumúvod
indledningpræludium
elõjátékelõzményprelúdium
forspilundanfari
preliudas
iesākumsievadsprelūdija
prelúdium
girişprelüt

prelude

[ˈpreljuːd]
A. Npreludio m (also Mus) (to de)
B. VTpreludiar

prelude

[ˈprɛljuːd] n
(MUSIC)prélude m
(fig)prélude m
a prelude to sth → un prélude à qch

prelude

nVorspiel nt; (Mus: = introduction to fugue) → Präludium nt; (fig)Auftakt m
vteinleiten, den Auftakt (+gen)bilden

prelude

[ˈprɛljuːd] npreludio

prelude

(ˈpreljuːd) noun
1. an event etc that goes before, and acts as an introduction to, something.
2. a piece of music played as an introduction to the main piece.
References in classic literature ?
The feminine graduates-to-be were seated in their own bedrooms, dressed with a completeness of detail to which all their past lives seemed to have been but a prelude.
But thereupon he immediately began to prelude, and fell into the tune which he knew would be taken as a special compliment by Mr.
The knight in the meantime, had brought the strings into some order, and after a short prelude, asked his host whether he would choose a sirvente in the language of oc, or a lai in the language of oui, or a virelai, or a ballad in the vulgar English.
Yet, after some time, he wearied of them, and would sit in his box at the opera, either alone or with Lord Henry, listening in rapt pleasure to "Tannhauser" and seeing in the prelude to that great work of art a presentation of the tragedy of his own soul.
For my part," said the barber, "I give my word here and before God that I will not repeat what your worship says, to King, Rook or earthly man- an oath I learned from the ballad of the curate, who, in the prelude, told the king of the thief who had robbed him of the hundred gold crowns and his pacing mule.
The Communists turn their attention chiefly to Germany, because that country is on the eve of a bourgeois revolution that is bound to be carried out under more advanced conditions of European civilisation, and with a much more developed proletariat, than that of England was in the seventeenth, and of France in the eighteenth century, and because the bourgeois revolution in Germany will be but the prelude to an immediately following proletarian revolution.
We were all silent, for we knew instinctively that this was only a prelude.
Unfortunately, as he advanced, his anger increased at every step; and instead of the proper and lofty speech he had prepared as a prelude to his challenge, he found nothing at the tip of his tongue but a gross personality, which he accompanied with a furious gesture.
The more so, as it will be the prelude to a better.
At length the death-stricken old man lay quietly in the torpor of mental and bodily exhaustion, with an imperceptible pulse, and breath that grew fainter and fainter, except when a long, deep, and irregular inspiration seemed to prelude the flight of his spirit.
Though the country is possessed by various tribes, whose mutual hostilities almost wholly prelude any intercourse between them; yet there are instances where a person having ratified friendly relations with some individual belonging longing to the valley, whose inmates are at war with his own, may, under particular restrictions, venture with impunity into the country of his friend, where, under other circumstances, he would have been treated as an enemy.
To be called into notice in such a manner, to hear that it was but the prelude to something so infinitely worse, to be told that she must do what was so impossible as to act; and then to have the charge of obstinacy and ingratitude follow it, enforced with such a hint at the dependence of her situation, had been too distressing at the time to make the remembrance when she was alone much less so, especially with the superadded dread of what the morrow might produce in continuation of the subject.