premise


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prem·ise

 (prĕm′ĭs)
n. also prem·iss (prĕm′ĭs)
1. A proposition upon which an argument is based or from which a conclusion is drawn.
2. Logic
a. One of the propositions in a deductive argument.
b. Either the major or the minor proposition of a syllogism, from which the conclusion is drawn.
3. premises
a. Land, the buildings on it, or both the land and the buildings on it.
b. A building or particular portion of a building.
c. Law The part of a deed that states the details of the conveyance of the property.
v. prem·ised, prem·is·ing, prem·is·es
1. To provide a basis for; base: "The American Revolution had been premised on a tacit bargain that regional conflicts would be subordinated to the need for unity among the states" (Ron Chernow).
2. To state or assume as a proposition in an argument.
3. To state in advance as an introduction or explanation.

[Middle English premisse, from Old French, from Medieval Latin praemissa (propositiō), (the proposition) put before, premise, from Latin, feminine past participle of praemittere, to set in front : prae-, pre- + mittere, to send.]
Word History: Why do we call a single building the premises? To answer this question, we must go back to the Middle Ages. The English word premises comes from the Latin praemissa, which is both a feminine singular and a neuter plural form of praemissus, the past participle of praemittere, "to send in advance, utter by way of preface, place in front, prefix." In Medieval Latin, the feminine form praemissa was often used with the sense "logical premise" in philosophical discussions, while the neuter plural praemissa was often used with the sense "things mentioned before" in legal documents. Latin praemissa was borrowed into Old French as premisse and thence into Middle English. In Middle English legal documents, the plural premisses came to be used with the sense "the property, collectively, which is specified in the beginning of a legal document and which is conveyed, as by grant." By the first half of the 1700s, this use of the word had given rise to the modern sense of premises, "a building with its grounds or appurtenances."

premise

n
(Logic) logic Also: premiss a statement that is assumed to be true for the purpose of an argument from which a conclusion is drawn
vb
(when tr, may take a clause as object) to state or assume (a proposition) as a premise in an argument, theory, etc
[C14: from Old French prémisse, from Medieval Latin praemissa sent on before, from Latin praemittere to dispatch in advance, from prae before + mittere to send]

prem•ise

(ˈprɛm ɪs)

n., v. -ised, -is•ing. n.
1. Also, prem′iss.Logic. a proposition supporting or helping to support a conclusion.
2. premises,
a. a tract of land including its buildings.
b. a building or part of a building together with its grounds or other appurtenances: Is your mother on the premises?
c. the property forming the subject of a conveyance or bequest.
3. Law.
a. a basis, stated or assumed, on which reasoning proceeds.
b. an earlier statement in a document.
c. (in a bill in equity) the statement of facts upon which the complaint is based.
v.t.
4. to set forth beforehand, as by way of introduction or explanation.
5. to state or assume (a proposition) as a premise for a conclusion.
v.i.
6. to state or assume a premise.
[1325–75; Middle English premiss < Medieval Latin praemissa, n. use of feminine of Latin praemissus, past participle of praemittere to send before =prae- pre- + mittere to send]

premise


Past participle: premised
Gerund: premising

Imperative
premise
premise
Present
I premise
you premise
he/she/it premises
we premise
you premise
they premise
Preterite
I premised
you premised
he/she/it premised
we premised
you premised
they premised
Present Continuous
I am premising
you are premising
he/she/it is premising
we are premising
you are premising
they are premising
Present Perfect
I have premised
you have premised
he/she/it has premised
we have premised
you have premised
they have premised
Past Continuous
I was premising
you were premising
he/she/it was premising
we were premising
you were premising
they were premising
Past Perfect
I had premised
you had premised
he/she/it had premised
we had premised
you had premised
they had premised
Future
I will premise
you will premise
he/she/it will premise
we will premise
you will premise
they will premise
Future Perfect
I will have premised
you will have premised
he/she/it will have premised
we will have premised
you will have premised
they will have premised
Future Continuous
I will be premising
you will be premising
he/she/it will be premising
we will be premising
you will be premising
they will be premising
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been premising
you have been premising
he/she/it has been premising
we have been premising
you have been premising
they have been premising
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been premising
you will have been premising
he/she/it will have been premising
we will have been premising
you will have been premising
they will have been premising
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been premising
you had been premising
he/she/it had been premising
we had been premising
you had been premising
they had been premising
Conditional
I would premise
you would premise
he/she/it would premise
we would premise
you would premise
they would premise
Past Conditional
I would have premised
you would have premised
he/she/it would have premised
we would have premised
you would have premised
they would have premised
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.premise - a statement that is assumed to be true and from which a conclusion can be drawn; "on the assumption that he has been injured we can infer that he will not to play"
posit, postulate - (logic) a proposition that is accepted as true in order to provide a basis for logical reasoning
major premise, major premiss - the premise of a syllogism that contains the major term (which is the predicate of the conclusion)
minor premise, minor premiss, subsumption - the premise of a syllogism that contains the minor term (which is the subject of the conclusion)
thesis - an unproved statement put forward as a premise in an argument
precondition, stipulation, condition - an assumption on which rests the validity or effect of something else
scenario - a postulated sequence of possible events; "planners developed several scenarios in case of an attack"
Verb1.premise - set forth beforehand, often as an explanation; "He premised these remarks so that his readers might understand"
exposit, set forth, expound - state; "set forth one's reasons"
2.premise - furnish with a preface or introduction; "She always precedes her lectures with a joke"; "He prefaced his lecture with a critical remark about the institution"
preamble - make a preliminary introduction, usually to a formal document
prologise, prologize, prologuize - write or speak a prologue
say, state, tell - express in words; "He said that he wanted to marry her"; "tell me what is bothering you"; "state your opinion"; "state your name"
3.premise - take something as preexisting and given
presuppose, suppose - take for granted or as a given; suppose beforehand; "I presuppose that you have done your work"

premise

noun
1. assumption, proposition, thesis, ground, argument, hypothesis, assertion, postulate, supposition, presupposition, postulation the premise that men and women are on equal terms in this society
verb
1. predicate, found, build, ground, establish, posit The plan is premised on continuing abundant tax returns.

premise

noun
Something taken to be true without proof:
verb
To take for granted without proof:
Informal: reckon.
Translations
předpokladpremisa
perustepremissi

premise

[ˈpremɪs]
A. N
1. (= hypothesis) → premisa f
2. premises (gen) → local msing; (= shop, restaurant, hotel) → establecimiento m; (= building) → edificio m
they're moving to new premisesse trasladan de local
there is a doctor on the premises at all timeshay un médico a todas horas en el edificio
for consumption on the premisespara consumirse en el local
licensed premiseslocal msing autorizado para la venta de bebidas alcohólicas
to see sb off the premisesechar a algn del local or establecimiento
B. VT (frm) to be premised onestar basado en, tener como premisa

premise

[ˈprɛmɪs] nprémisse f
the premise that → la prémisse selon laquelle
to be based on the premise that → partir du principe que, être fondé sur la prémisse selon laquelle

premise

n
(esp Logic) → Prämisse f (spec), → Voraussetzung f
premises pl (of school, factory)Gelände nt; (= building)Gebäude nt; (= shop)Räumlichkeiten pl; (form: = house) → Besitz m, → Anwesen nt; licensed premisesSchankort m; business premisesGeschäftsräume pl; to use as business premisesgeschäftlich nutzen; drinking is not allowed in or on these premiseses ist nicht erlaubt, hier Alkohol zu trinken; will you escort him off the premises?würden Sie ihn bitte hinausbegleiten?; he was asked to leave the premisesman forderte ihn auf, das Gelände etc zu verlassen; get off my premisesverlassen Sie sofort mein Land or Grundstück!
vt to be premised on something (form)auf etw (dat)basieren

premise

[ˈprɛmɪs] n (hypothesis) → premessa
References in classic literature ?
And here let me premise that if any of the elders think there is too much `lovering' in the story, as I fear they may (I'm not afraid the young folks will make that objection), I can only say with Mrs.
While he is so occupied, I will tell you, reader, what they are: and first, I must premise that they are nothing wonderful.
The premise of release which she saw in it from the horror of her own hesitation roused the last energies of her despair.
This state of things I have thought it necessary to premise for the information of the general reader, who might be apt to forget, that, although no great historical events, such as war or insurrection, mark the existence of the Anglo-Saxons as a separate people subsequent to the reign of William the Second; yet the great national distinctions betwixt them and their conquerors, the recollection of what they had formerly been, and to what they were now reduced, continued down to the reign of Edward the Third, to keep open the wounds which the Conquest had inflicted, and to maintain a line of separation betwixt the descendants of the victor Normans and the vanquished Saxons.
Then, friend John, am I to take it that you simply accept fact, and are satisfied to let from premise to conclusion be a blank?
Bellegarde did not in the least cause him to modify his needful premise that all Frenchmen are of a frothy and imponderable substance; he simply reminded him that light materials may be beaten up into a most agreeable compound.
Instead, with all the assurance that deductive reasoning from a wrong premise induces in one, Mr.
From that premise the school of tulip-fanciers, the most exclusive of all schools, worked out the following syllogism in the same year: --
They think it is their own personality, that they have only one personality; and from such a premise they can conclude only that they have lived previous lives.
By that last statement you have given me back my premise.
There was abundance of conversation, and little fear of its ever flagging, for the good-humour of the glorious old twins drew everybody out, and Tim Linkinwater's sister went off into a long and circumstantial account of Tim Linkinwater's infancy, immediately after the very first glass of champagne--taking care to premise that she was very much Tim's junior, and had only become acquainted with the facts from their being preserved and handed down in the family.
I should premise that I use the term Struggle for Existence in a large and metaphorical sense, including dependence of one being on another, and including (which is more important) not only the life of the individual, but success in leaving progeny.