premodern


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pre·mod·ern

 (prē-mŏd′ərn)
adj.
Existing or coming before a modern period or time: the feudal system of premodern Japan.

premodern

(priːˈmɒdən)
adj
(Historical Terms) of the period before the modern era
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References in periodicals archive ?
At the Margins: Minority Groups in Premodern Italy.
Two decades ago, there was a group of historians of children who argued not only for sharp contrasts between the modern and premodern, but also for sharp preferences for the modern.
Its method, pursued through five big and impressively abstract chapters of conceptual summary and analysis, is to stage a "dialogue" between the premodern Augustine and the postmodern Foucault, in which each by "extending the reach of the other" (79) will contribute to demonstrating "what has been theologically lost, subjugated, or colonized to serve nontheological aims in modern culture" (6).
Thus the Dia:Beacon architects started with a structure that was at once modern and premodern, and so were able to develop a spatial organization that was suited to that called for by Minimalism, one that had emerged following the architectonic redefinition of modernism by Louis Kahn and others.
The world pictured in these games may be premodern, but high-resolution graphics and breathtaking computerized cinematography are central to the experience of the current Tolkien obsessive.
Leibniz on Individuals and Individuation: The Persistence of Premodern Ideas in Modern Philosophy.
The book explores trajectories and hermeneutics; the "New Catholic Movements"; Vatican II and moral theology; Evangelium Vitae as a case study; the salvation of the adherents of other religions; the Catholic Church and mission to the Jews; a soldier for the Great War, Henri de Lubac and the patristic sources for premodern theology; and interpreting the council and its consequences.
In her book Vidya Dehejia goes beyond an iconographical analysis of selected artworks from premodern India by including passages from a variety of textual sources that also underscore the fundamental position of human and divine bodies.
Particularly impressive is her stress on the nuns' solidarity or group identity, the absence of which had been deplored for women of the premodern period.
Given this divide, scholars of the previous century have suggested that a retrieval of premodern interpretive strategies may offer a way of bridging biblical studies and theological inquiry.
Divorced at a later age, women are less likely to remarry than their premodern counterparts, nor do they have natal families they can rely on.
The conflict is similar for Robinson: At the Venice Biennale in 2001, he represented New Zealand with complex installations joining cybernetic models with premodern Maori myths.