prenomination


Related to prenomination: premonition, Priapistic

prenomination

(ˌpriːnɒmɪˈneɪʃən)
n
the act of naming in advance of a formal nomination
References in periodicals archive ?
This pair transposes to PRENOMINATIONS, the plural of PRENOMINATION, an obsolete noun, a previous mentioning (W3)
Note that this is a single-letter transdeletion of RIPON, MINNESOTA / PRENOMINATIONS, above.
Although having the later convention helped Clinton by giving him more time to spend his prenomination treasury, his acceptance of the limit imposed by public funding minimized that advantage.
The current administration has cut out the ABA from the prenomination aspect entirely, even for district and court of appeals judges.
They helped Bill Clinton chill out intraparty opposition but gave him millions of tax dollars to run a prenomination race he didn't have.
This stage, which I call the prenomination process, has been a source of continued friction between the two branches.
It is important to understand that the prenomination process is not, and probably never will be, the subject of litigation and thus can never receive declarative judgment from the courts.
As neither the president nor Congress can rely on the Supreme Court to tell them how the prenomination process functions, they must turn to other sources.
Statements from early leading political figures mainly advance an executive-dominated prenomination process.
Sherman did well in describing what would become the major theoretical and practical reasons for lawmakers counseling the president in the prenomination process.
For instance, Presidents George Washington and Andrew Jackson suggested at times that the Senate would have no role during the prenomination process.
Despite his assertion that the Senate would have no role in nominating, as the first president of the United States, George Washington was well aware practical considerations required congressional involvement in the prenomination process.