prepose

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prepose

(priːˈpəʊz)
vb (tr)
(Grammar) to place before
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.prepose - place before another constituent in the sentence; "English preposes the adpositions; Japanese postposes them"
lay, place, put, set, position, pose - put into a certain place or abstract location; "Put your things here"; "Set the tray down"; "Set the dogs on the scent of the missing children"; "Place emphasis on a certain point"
References in periodicals archive ?
The Poetic Paradigm: Rhetorical Schemes 1 2 3 4 sound schemes alliteration rhyme consonance pararhyme assonance reverse rhyme syntactic schemes preposing centering postposing peripheralizing lexical schemes anaphora antistrophe epistrophe epanalepsis symploce
extensive literature and various theories on preposing in chapter 3.
With some pronouns, it can be done by preposing chung or cac, meaning group.
Note that any of the expressions in (34) may be identified by preposing the, giving:
Among the topics are computational puzzles of conditional clause preposing, the autonomous contribution of syntax and pragmatics to the acquisition of the Hebrew definite article, and minimalist languages and the correct prefix property.
A more common practice is preposing a direct question to the main verb:
Preposing of temporal and causal clauses is primarily motivated by general discourse pragmatic considerations; that is, temporal and causal clauses precede the main clause if they function to provide a thematic ground for the subsequent discourse.
Putting tags in a syntactically interruptive medial position rather than preposing them creates the impression of a dynamic verbal exchange whose pace is not unnecessarily slowed down by the initial reporting verb (Collins 2001).
a construction that, in ME, is replaced with (4) it befel; (5) the syntactic preposing of whan-clauses; (6) the OE mystery particle hwaet (familiar from the first line of Beowulf); and (7) the ME first-person epistemic parenthetical I gesse, which, as a narratorial intervention, has particular narratological relevance.
To that extent, (36) is not really an accurate paraphrase of (35), for the adverb in (36) does not attribute slowness to the agent, whereas the adjective in (35) does, and the reason why some speakers object to such discontinuities may have to do with the fact that preposing the adjective implies attributing to the individual denoted by the noun a property they feel it does not have.
First, the identification of the predicates which allow that-deletion with the predicates which allow complement preposing is misleading.
76a) has a "not before" reading, and the specifier is appropriately placed for having the functor phrase in its scope; and preposing of the negatively specified functor phrase triggers inversion.