prepositional phrase


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Related to prepositional phrase: Infinitive phrase, prepositions

prepositional phrase

A prepositional phrase is made up of at least a preposition and its object, which can be a noun, pronoun, or a noun phrase. Often times, the object will have a modifier or modifiers (such as adjectives, noun adjuncts, etc.) that appear between it and the preposition. These specify or describe the object, but, unlike prepositions, they do not serve to connect the object grammatically to the rest of the sentence.
Prepositional phrases can behave in two ways in a sentence: as an adjective modifying a noun in the sentence, or as an adverb modifying a verb, adjective, or adverb in the sentence.
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prepositional phrase

n. Abbr. PP
A phrase that consists of a preposition and its object and has adjectival or adverbial value, such as in the house in the people in the house or by him in The book was written by him.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.prepositional phrase - a phrase beginning with a preposition
phrase - an expression consisting of one or more words forming a grammatical constituent of a sentence
Translations
syntagme prépositionnel
References in periodicals archive ?
StP--'Itl-) or through the pattern with the initial prepositional phrase (as in (1): 1--'itl- [sup.
Chapter two, "Prepositional phrases in Middle English", introduces both the tools for the analysis of Middle English prepositional phrases and the methodology used in the study.
In sentence (28) the phrase ahunemm can only have the reading 'again' and not 'now' because the time reference is given by the prepositional phrase bezih gize 'at this time'.
Spatial relations are expressed by prepositional phrases.
This is demonstrated by putting the smaller boxes inside the larger boxes (the noun group box (red) inside the Participant box (red); the verb group box (blue) inside the Process box (blue); the prepositional phrase box (yellow) inside the Circumstance box (yellow); the adverbial group box (yellow) inside the Circumstance box (yellow); and also the noun group box (red) inside the Circumstance box (yellow), because a noun group, whilst generally expressing a Participant, can also express a Circumstance).
1] the subject in the active sentence may be added in a prepositional phrase with "by".
Converting the object of the prepositional phrase (i.
For instance, to estimate the frequency of "on" as a preposition and "runway" as the subject of its prepositional phrase, look for statistics of "on" and any surface or, if the sample size is not enough, "on" and a physical object.
Most lawyers overuse past participial phrases when a simple prepositional phrase, single adjective, or possessive noun would do fine.
For example, is the ligatured verb + prepositional phrase ndrkln in AD.
The gradual grammaticalization of because in English down the prepositional phrase to conjunction cline is evidenced by the presence of such phrases as by this cause that, by (the) cause that, attested, for example, in Chaucer and some medical texts.
Mayan languages express indirect objects through an applicative suffix on verbs, a prepositional phrase, or the possessor of the direct object.