prepositional phrase


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Related to prepositional phrase: Infinitive phrase, prepositions

prepositional phrase

A prepositional phrase is made up of at least a preposition and its object, which can be a noun, pronoun, or a noun phrase. Often times, the object will have a modifier or modifiers (such as adjectives, noun adjuncts, etc.) that appear between it and the preposition. These specify or describe the object, but, unlike prepositions, they do not serve to connect the object grammatically to the rest of the sentence.
Prepositional phrases can behave in two ways in a sentence: as an adjective modifying a noun in the sentence, or as an adverb modifying a verb, adjective, or adverb in the sentence.
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prepositional phrase

n. Abbr. PP
A phrase that consists of a preposition and its object and has adjectival or adverbial value, such as in the house in the people in the house or by him in The book was written by him.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.prepositional phrase - a phrase beginning with a preposition
phrase - an expression consisting of one or more words forming a grammatical constituent of a sentence
Translations
syntagme prépositionnel
References in periodicals archive ?
The occurrence of two e-modifiers in final position is also possible, as shown in (33), which is motivated by the Principle of Increasing Complexity, since the pronominal adverb la 'there' precedes the prepositional phrase durante o jantar 'during the supper'.
When a verb forms the passive, the object of the active clause becomes the subject in the passive one; and if that verb had a prepositional phrase dependent on it then the head of that prepositional phrase becomes the subject of the passive clause leaving the preposition stranded.
Similar patterns exist for the objects of passives and infinitives and for cases where the target noun phrase appears as the subject of a clause or the object of a prepositional phrase.
The true prepositional phrase is composed of a "preposition and a noun phrase" (out the door, by Billy, etc.
The prepositional phrase withoute (n) more is occasionally to be found as a line-filler and rhyme-tag in Middle English poetry.
Genitive complements, either without prepositions or in a prepositional phrase od+genitive (6), with verbs such as bojati se (to be afraid of), plasiti se (to be scared of), strahovati (to fear), gnusati se (to loathe), stidjeti se (to be ashamed of), sramiti se (to be ashamed of), groziti se (tu shudder), libiti se (to hesitate), zazirati (to have an aversion to) and so on are primarily motivated by the nature of emotion they express i.
For this purpose, the following structures were considered: adverbial phrase, adjectival phrase, noun phrase, prepositional phrase, and verb phrase, adverbials in dependent clauses and those used parenthetically.
On the other hand, the conative construction is realized by a prepositional phrase introduced by on preceding accusative case objects.
The other two examples given in (29a) are remarkable in so far as they may drop a prepositional phrase with mit and a nonreferential sich in the reciprocal construction as opposed to the basic use with singular subjects (29b):
Sentences (19) and (20) are contradictory because the prepositional phrase contradicts the direction conveyed by the verbs' meanings.
In the following example, there is a prepositional phrase ("over the counter") within the noun string.
This is often easy to overlook when an intervening prepositional phrase confuses the issue.