prepotent


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pre·po·tent

 (prē-pōt′nt)
adj.
1. Greater in power, influence, or force than another or others; predominant.
2. Genetics Of, having, or exhibiting prepotency.

[Middle English, from Latin praepotēns, praepotent-, present participle of praeposse, to be more powerful : prae-, pre- + posse, to be able or powerful; see poti- in Indo-European roots.]

pre·po′tent·ly adv.

prepotent

(prɪˈpəʊtənt)
adj
1. greater in power, force, or influence
2. (Biology) biology showing prepotency
[C15: from Latin praepotens very powerful, from posse to be able]
preˈpotently adv

pre•po•tent

(priˈpoʊt nt)

adj.
1. preeminent in power, authority, or influence; predominant.
2. noting, pertaining to, or having genetic prepotency.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin praepotent- (s. of praepotēns), present participle of praeposse to have greater power]
pre•po′tent•ly, adv.
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prepotent

adjective
Having preeminent significance:
References in classic literature ?
Bees will act like a camel-hair pencil, and it is quite sufficient just to touch the anthers of one flower and then the stigma of another with the same brush to ensure fertilisation; but it must not be supposed that bees would thus produce a multitude of hybrids between distinct species; for if you bring on the same brush a plant's own pollen and pollen from another species, the former will have such a prepotent effect, that it will invariably and completely destroy, as has been shown by Gartner, any influence from the foreign pollen.
I suspect that it must arise from the pollen of a distinct variety having a prepotent effect over a flower's own pollen; and that this is part of the general law of good being derived from the intercrossing of distinct individuals of the same species.
According to Barkley's theory of AD/HD (58), deficient behavioral inhibition is the core deficit of the disorder Behavioral inhibition may be separated into three interrelated processes called "inhibition of the initial prepotent response to an event," "stopping of an ongoing response," and "interference control" (59).
Prepotent Trainer: Ger Lyons 5th, 7f two-year-old maiden, Gowran Park, August 12 This looked a potentially decent contest and a few winners should come out of it.
Morgans descended from one prepotent sire, Figure, who was born in 1789.
Color-Word Reading is the third component of the Stroop test, which is a measure of response inhibition requiring patients to inhibit a prepotent response.
The abilities tested in this study included how fast the players can switch tasks (an indicator of mental flexibility); how fast can the players adapt to a new situation instead of relying on the same strategy (the ability to inhibit prepotent or predominant responses); and how well they can focus on information while blocking out distractors or inappropriate responses (also known as the Flanker task in cognitive psychology).
CEC is dominant in tasks requiring attentional and behavioral inhibitory control, working memory, and ability to suppress prepotent responding, via prefrontal support.
A-not-B, which depends on working memory and is believed to reflect early development of executive function, involves the ability to briefly maintain information in memory and to override a prepotent response--in this case, to use visual input to override the impulse to search where the toy was previously found (Espy et al.
Le public est en colere contre Mourinho a cause de son entetement de maintenir une tactique de jeu peu creative, ses positions polemiques et son comportement prepotent et arrogant a l'egard des autres clubs.
1) Based on the Maslow's hierarchy of needs, all the needs have a positive effect in the SWB of the elderly in Pakistan with lower needs being more prepotent than the higher ones.
33, 1962, at 3 ("[A] single negative trait is more prepotent than