preprint

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pre·print

 (prē′prĭnt′)
n.
Something printed and often distributed in partial or preliminary form in advance of official publication: a preprint of a scientific article.
tr.v. (prē-prĭnt′) pre·print·ed, pre·print·ing, pre·prints
To print in advance.

preprint

(priːˈprɪnt)
vb (tr)
(Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) to print a section of work in advance
n
(Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) a section of work printed in advance of the whole
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
EngRN will enable engineers to share early stage research - preprints, working papers and data - prior to publication.
Most newspapers receive preprints and/or self-adhesive sticky notes on a regular basis.
In February 2016, a group of well-esteemed biomedical researchers met at a workshop entitled Accelerating Science and Publication in Biology (ASAPbio) to discuss the potential role of preprints in facilitating the communication of biological research.
Library administrators can notify their patrons of available preprints through the administrative functions within EJS, such as the Local Notes feature.
Newspaper preprints were especially attractive to these advertisers because, unlike most papers then, preprints offered high-quality color on glossy paper.
Starting in January 2004, AIDS Treatment News is moving to a system of publishing drafts or preprints of articles online as news happens, then publishing these stories monthly in the print edition.
Preprints can be ordered by completing the appropriate portion of the conference registration form.
That venture, which posts physics preprints, thrived to become the benchmark for later electronic preprint efforts.
Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS), producer of a compendium of chemistry-related information, has announced that it has begun to abstract and index preprints, a new class of research report distributed on the Web in advance of or in lieu of formal publication.
CAS will monitor preprint servers in chemistry-related fields and begin indexing preprints posted in 2000.
That many fewer resort to postal distribution of their preprints in 1999 is a sign of the success and timeliness of Ginsparg's initiative, which has grown in acceptance, size, and comprehensiveness.
a Southern California-based provider of alternative distribution services for advertising preprints.