presage


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pres·age

 (prĕs′ĭj)
n.
1. An indication or warning of a future occurrence; an omen.
2. A feeling or intuition of what is going to occur; a presentiment.
3. Prophetic significance or meaning.
4. Archaic A prediction.
v. (prĭ-sāj′, prĕs′ĭj) pre·saged, pre·sag·ing, pre·sag·es
v.tr.
1. To indicate or warn of in advance; portend.
2. To have a presentiment of.
3. To foretell or predict.
v.intr.
To make or utter a prediction.

[Middle English, from Latin praesāgium, from praesāgīre, to perceive beforehand : prae-, pre- + sāgīre, to perceive; see sāg- in Indo-European roots.]

pre·sage′ful (prĭ-sāj′fəl) adj.

presage

n
1. an intimation or warning of something about to happen; portent; omen
2. a sense of what is about to happen; foreboding
3. archaic a forecast or prediction
vb
4. (tr) to have a presentiment of
5. (tr) to give a forewarning of; portend
6. (intr) to make a prediction
[C14: from Latin praesāgium presentiment, from praesāgīre to perceive beforehand, from sāgīre to perceive acutely]
preˈsageful adj
preˈsagefully adv
preˈsager n

pres•age

(ˈprɛs ɪdʒ; v. also prɪˈseɪdʒ)

v. -aged, -ag•ing,
n. v.t.
1. to portend; foreshadow: The incidents may presage war.
2. to forecast; predict.
v.i.
3. to make a prediction.
n.
4. presentiment; foreboding.
5. something that portends or foreshadows a future event; an omen.
6. prophetic significance; augury.
7. Archaic. a prediction.
[1350–1400; Middle English (n.) < Middle French < Latin praesāgium=praesāg(us) having a foreboding (prae- pre- + sāgus prophetic; compare sagacious) + -ium -ium1]
pres′ag•er, n.

presage


Past participle: presaged
Gerund: presaging

Imperative
presage
presage
Present
I presage
you presage
he/she/it presages
we presage
you presage
they presage
Preterite
I presaged
you presaged
he/she/it presaged
we presaged
you presaged
they presaged
Present Continuous
I am presaging
you are presaging
he/she/it is presaging
we are presaging
you are presaging
they are presaging
Present Perfect
I have presaged
you have presaged
he/she/it has presaged
we have presaged
you have presaged
they have presaged
Past Continuous
I was presaging
you were presaging
he/she/it was presaging
we were presaging
you were presaging
they were presaging
Past Perfect
I had presaged
you had presaged
he/she/it had presaged
we had presaged
you had presaged
they had presaged
Future
I will presage
you will presage
he/she/it will presage
we will presage
you will presage
they will presage
Future Perfect
I will have presaged
you will have presaged
he/she/it will have presaged
we will have presaged
you will have presaged
they will have presaged
Future Continuous
I will be presaging
you will be presaging
he/she/it will be presaging
we will be presaging
you will be presaging
they will be presaging
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been presaging
you have been presaging
he/she/it has been presaging
we have been presaging
you have been presaging
they have been presaging
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been presaging
you will have been presaging
he/she/it will have been presaging
we will have been presaging
you will have been presaging
they will have been presaging
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been presaging
you had been presaging
he/she/it had been presaging
we had been presaging
you had been presaging
they had been presaging
Conditional
I would presage
you would presage
he/she/it would presage
we would presage
you would presage
they would presage
Past Conditional
I would have presaged
you would have presaged
he/she/it would have presaged
we would have presaged
you would have presaged
they would have presaged
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.presage - a foreboding about what is about to happen
boding, foreboding, premonition, presentiment - a feeling of evil to come; "a steadily escalating sense of foreboding"; "the lawyer had a presentiment that the judge would dismiss the case"
2.presage - a sign of something about to happenpresage - a sign of something about to happen; "he looked for an omen before going into battle"
augury, foretoken, preindication, sign - an event that is experienced as indicating important things to come; "he hoped it was an augury"; "it was a sign from God"
auspice - a favorable omen
foreboding - an unfavorable omen
death knell - an omen of death or destruction
Verb1.presage - indicate by signspresage - indicate by signs; "These signs bode bad news"
threaten - to be a menacing indication of something:"The clouds threaten rain"; "Danger threatens"
bespeak, betoken, indicate, signal, point - be a signal for or a symptom of; "These symptoms indicate a serious illness"; "Her behavior points to a severe neurosis"; "The economic indicators signal that the euro is undervalued"
foreshow - foretell by divine inspiration

presage

verb
1. portend to, point to, warn of, signify, omen, bode, foreshadow, augur, betoken, adumbrate, forebode, foretoken Diplomats fear the incidents presage a new chapter in the conflict.
noun
1. omen, sign, warning, forecast, prediction, prophecy, portent, harbinger, intimation, forewarning, prognostication, augury, prognostic, auspice Soldiers used to believe a raven was a presage of coming battle.

presage

noun
A phenomenon that serves as a sign or warning of some future good or evil:
Idiom: writing on the wall.
verb
To give an indication of something in advance:
Translations

presage

[ˈpresɪdʒ] (liter)
A. Npresagio m
B. VTpresagiar

presage

n (= omen)Vorzeichen nt, → Anzeichen nt, → Vorbote m; (= feeling)Vorahnung f
vtankünd(ig)en, andeuten
References in classic literature ?
Gathering no encouragement from this startling presage of the nature of the scrutiny he was likely to undergo from the more mature judgments of the men, there was an instant when the young soldier would have retreated.
Arriving at a valley where travellers seldom escape being plundered, we were obliged to double our pace, and were so happy as to pass it without meeting with any misfortune, except that we heard a bird sing on our left hand--a certain presage among these people of some great calamity at hand.
Ah, not if you were like me, if sleep was to you a presage of horror
Reports were whispered about, like certain sounds which announce, as they whistle from wave to wave, the coming storm -- and when they pass athwart a multitude, presage an emeute.
The men, on their part, observed that the prince was proud and haughty, that he loved to look down those who fixed their eyes upon him too long or too earnestly, which gave presage of a master.
Then for a moment there was intense stillness, made horrible by a presage of what was to come.
which made the heart of Raoul beat, such griefs did it presage for her whom lately he loved so dearly; this terrible
And above all, the sign of the cross to that instrument was to us a great rejoicing, and as it were a certain presage of good.
As Mrs Varden distinctly heard, and was intended to hear, all that Miggs said, and as these words appeared to convey in metaphorical terms a presage or foreboding that she would at some early period droop beneath her trials and take an easy flight towards the stars, she immediately began to languish, and taking a volume of the Manual from a neighbouring table, leant her arm upon it as though she were Hope and that her Anchor.
The clouds, which had been threatening all day, spread out in a dense and sluggish mass of vapour, already yielded large drops of rain, and seemed to presage a violent thunder-storm, when Mr.
Jane's frame of mind was naturally depressed and timorous, having been affected by Miranda's gloomy presages of evil to come.
Melancholy in a capitalist, like the appearance of a comet, presages some misfortune to the world.