presbyter

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pres·by·ter

 (prĕz′bĭ-tər, prĕs′-)
n.
1. A priest in various hierarchical churches.
2. An elder in the Presbyterian Church.

[Late Latin, from Greek presbuteros, from comparative of presbus, old man; see per in Indo-European roots.]

presbyter

(ˈprɛzbɪtə)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms)
a. an elder of a congregation in the early Christian Church
b. (in some Churches having episcopal politics) an official who is subordinate to a bishop and has administrative, teaching, and sacerdotal functions
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) (in some hierarchical Churches) another name for priest
3. (Protestantism) (in the Presbyterian Church)
a. a teaching elder
b. a ruling elder
[C16: from Late Latin, from Greek presbuteros an older man, from presbus old man]

pres•by•ter

(ˈprɛz bɪ tər, ˈprɛs-)

n.
1. (in the early Christian church) an office bearer who exercised teaching, priestly, and administrative functions.
2. (in hierarchical churches) a priest.
3. an elder in a Presbyterian church.
[1590–1600; < Late Latin: older, elder, presbyter < Greek presbýteros=présby(s) old + -teros comp. suffix]
pres•byt′er•al (-ˈbɪt ər əl) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.presbyter - an elder in the Presbyterian Churchpresbyter - an elder in the Presbyterian Church
elder - any of various church officers
References in periodicals archive ?
The path ahead, then, is dialogue among yourselves, dialogue in your presbyterates, dialogue with laypersons, dialogue with families, dialogue with society.
The Cardinals, who oversee the presbyterates of various titular and quasi parish churches of Rome, are the advisers and collaborators of the Pope.
Ron Knott, St Meinrads Seminary and School of Theology, founder of the Institute for Priests and Presbyterates will offer presentations on spiritual leadership of priests, stages in spiritual growth, influencing people to move to deeper discipleship, the scandal of Presbyteral polarization, and what is required of priests and of others for building Presbyteral unity.