prescriptivism


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pre·scrip·tiv·ism

 (prĭ-skrĭp′tə-vĭz′əm)
n.
The support or promotion of prescriptive grammar.

pre·scrip′tiv·ist adj. & n.

prescriptivism

(prɪˈskrɪptɪˌvɪzəm)
n
(Philosophy) ethics the theory that moral utterances have no truth value but prescribe attitudes to others and express the conviction of the speaker. Compare descriptivism, emotivism

prescriptivism

purism.
See also: Language
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.prescriptivism - (ethics) a doctrine holding that moral statements prescribe appropriate attitudes and behavior
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
moral philosophy, ethics - the philosophical study of moral values and rules
2.prescriptivism - (linguistics) a doctrine supporting or promoting prescriptive linguistics
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
linguistics - the scientific study of language
Translations

prescriptivism

[prɪˈskrɪptɪˌvɪzəm] Nprescriptivismo m

prescriptivism

nPräskriptivismus m
References in periodicals archive ?
128) It rejects centralism, positivism, monism, and prescriptivism as inherent features of law.
1) On one side of the barricades we find the "defenders of our language," (2) adherents to linguistic purism and prescriptivism who tend to label linguistic changes as corruption or bastardization.
Priestley's and Lowth's grammars epitomized, respectively, the two main trends of grammatical tradition, namely descriptivism and prescriptivism.
He asserted that his prescriptivism was driven by the urge to stick to the Swahili culture and heritage.
While upholding this tendency in Modernist literature, the present paper argues that Modernist texts, even at their best, may encompass such anti-Modernist elements as overt and authoritative didacticism and prescriptivism, reminiscent of Neoclassical texts.
noncognitivist) theories of emotivism and prescriptivism should be rejected because moral judgments are meant by ordinary people as assertions about supposed matters of objective fact.
There are several alternative theories of ethics, including utilitarianism (Bentham, 1876; Mill, 1895), universal prescriptivism (Hare, 1981), Kant's theory (1993), intuitionism (Moore, 1966; Ross, 1930), and the theory of information ethics (Floridi, 1999).
If the argument of her book aims partly to assess their influence on readers, directly or through criticism conditioned by their prescriptivism, then it misses its target* For critics, whatever the period (Romantic or otherwise), often enough discuss the language of a work under review without having to adhere to a particular school of grammar.
Harean prescriptivism conceives of moral development as a process whereby commonplace action-guiding practices are turned into formalized principles, each with its scope of application precisely spelled out.
Indeed, this fear of prescriptivism came to inform an active rejection of eco-feminist and vegetarian feminist theory.
Tired of the prescriptivism of the read/write/speak/listen English curriculum doctrine, our most able pupils crave a stimulus that questions as much as it answers, opens debate, broadens horizons.
To a somewhat lesser extent he examines issue of metaethics, including intuitionism, emotivism, and prescriptivism.