prescriptivist


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Related to prescriptivist: descriptivism, descriptivist

pre·scrip·tiv·ism

 (prĭ-skrĭp′tə-vĭz′əm)
n.
The support or promotion of prescriptive grammar.

pre·scrip′tiv·ist adj. & n.

prescriptivist

(prɪˈskrɪptɪvɪst)
n
1. (Linguistics) someone who advocates prescriptivism
2. (Philosophy) someone who advocates prescriptivism
References in periodicals archive ?
This prescriptivist approach isn't new or unique to the DILG.
British English grammar, spelling and punctuation conventions were assumed as the standard, given the location of the university; however, a prescriptivist approach was not considered and variation resulting from different national language varieties (c.
This being said, Wallace's subtle understanding of the political issues essential to the very topic of linguistic prescription demonstrates that it is possible to be a prescriptivist without being prejudiced.
Yet Chambers (following Collier's lead) set an oddly prescriptivist tone in his contribution to this descriptivist project.
And we might read Greet's prescriptivist linguistics, his interest in locating the "correct" American dialect, to be an extension of this politics.
Nabokov is no moral prescriptivist but a first-rate artist; as such, he shows with unerring fidelity the human and moral consequences of Humbert's actions.
Some of these figures line up in the prescriptivist (or tradition-minded) and others in the descriptivist (or change-accepting) trenches.
In the inner-circle countries such as Canada, the US, and the UK, assessment in school settings has historically been focused on prescriptivist academic language conventions.
We believed it necessary to consider the NDA in the light of a prescriptivist dictionary, the DRAE, and also a widely-recognised corpus which incorporates actual uses, the CREA.
8) It is worth noting that those consequentialists who follow Richard Hare's prescriptivist derivation of ethics are committed to the view that anyone who utters the word 'ought' in a moral sense thereby commits him or herself to all of morality including all obligations flowing from consequentialism (Hare 1952).
118) His tone mixes conversational writing with a hard, prescriptivist message: There are normatively correct actions to take, and to choose not to take them indicates a weakness of character.
HENRY WATSON Fowler's Dictionary of Modern English Usage is an unabashedly prescriptivist tome, which is to say that it doesn't waffle in describing the right way, and the wrong way, to use English words.