pressed


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Related to pressed: hard pressed, pressed for time, pressed juice

press 1

 (prĕs)
v. pressed, press·ing, press·es
v.tr.
1.
a. To exert steady weight or force against: an indentation where the rock pressed the ground.
b. To move by applying pressure: press a piano key; press one's face into a pillow.
c. To squeeze or clasp in fondness or concern: pressed her hand before leaving.
2.
a. To squeeze the juice or other contents from: press lemons.
b. To extract (juice, for example) by squeezing or compressing.
3.
a. To reshape or make compact by applying steady force; compress: pressed the clay in a mold.
b. To iron (clothing, for example).
c. To make (a sound recording), originally by pressing (a vinyl phonograph record) under pressure in a mold.
4.
a. To bear down on or attack: The army pressed the rebels for months.
b. To carry on or advance vigorously (an attack, for instance).
c. To place in trying or distressing circumstances: Are you pressed for money?
5.
a. To insist upon or put forward insistently: press a claim; press an argument.
b. To try to influence or persuade, as by insistent arguments; pressure or entreat: He pressed her for a reply.
c. To insist that someone accept (something). Often used with on or upon: was given to pressing peculiar gifts upon his nieces.
6. Sports To lift (a weight) to a position above the head without moving the legs.
v.intr.
1. To exert force or pressure: felt the backpack pressing on her shoulders.
2. To be worrisome or depressing; weigh heavily: Guilt pressed upon his conscience.
3.
a. To advance eagerly; move forward urgently: We pressed through the crowd to get to the bus.
b. To assemble closely and in large numbers; crowd: Fans pressed around the movie star.
4. To continue a course of action, especially in spite of difficulties: decided to press ahead with the performance even with a sore throat.
5. To require haste or urgent action: matters that have not stopped pressing.
6. To employ urgent persuasion or entreaty: The supervisor has been pressing to get us to finish the project sooner.
7. To iron clothes or other material.
8. Sports To raise or lift a weight in a press.
9. Basketball To employ a press.
10. Sports In golf, to try to hit long or risky shots, typically with unsuccessful results.
n.
1. Any of various machines or devices that apply pressure: a cider press.
2. A printing press.
3.
a. A place or establishment where matter is printed: sent the book's files to the press.
b. A publishing company: Which press has acquired that manuscript?
4.
a. The communications media considered as a whole, especially the agencies that collect, publish, transmit, or broadcast news and other information to the public: freedom of the press; got a job writing for the press.
b. News or other information disseminated to the public in printed, broadcast, or electronic form: kept the scandal out of the press.
c. The people involved in the media, as news reporters and broadcasters: took questions from the press after her speech.
d. The kind or extent of coverage a person or event receives in the media: "Like the pool hall and the tattoo parlor, the motorcycle usually gets a bad press" (R.Z. Sheppard).
5.
a. A large gathering; a crowd: lost our friend in the press of people.
b. The act of gathering in large numbers or of pushing forward: The press of the crowd broke the gates.
6. An act of pressing down or applying pressure: with the press of a button.
7. The haste or urgency of business or matters: the press of the day's events.
8. The set of proper creases in a garment or fabric, formed by ironing.
9. Chiefly Scots and Irish An upright closet or case used for storing clothing, books, or other articles.
10. Sports A lift in weightlifting in which the weight is raised to shoulder level and then steadily pushed straight overhead without movement of the legs.
11. Basketball An aggressive defense tactic in which players guard opponents closely, often over the entire court.
Idioms:
go to press
To be submitted for printing.
in press
Submitted for printing; in the process of being printed.
press charges
To bring a formal accusation of criminal wrongdoing against someone.
pressed for time
In a hurry; under time pressure.
press the flesh Informal
To shake hands and mingle with many people, especially while campaigning for public office.

[Middle English pressen, from Old French presser, from Latin pressāre, frequentative of premere, to press; see per- in Indo-European roots.]

press 2

 (prĕs)
tr.v. pressed, press·ing, press·es
1. To force into service in the army or navy; impress.
2.
a. To take arbitrarily or by force, especially for public use.
b. To use in a manner different from the usual or intended, especially in an emergency.
n.
1. Conscription or impressment into service, especially into the army or navy.
2. Obsolete An official warrant for impressing men into military service.

[Alteration of obsolete prest, to hire for military service by advance payment, from Middle English, enlistment money, loan, from Old French, from prester, to lend, from Medieval Latin praestāre, from Latin, to furnish, from praestō, present, at hand; see ghes- in Indo-European roots.]

pressed

(prɛst)
adj
having very little of something, esp time or money
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.pressed - compacted by ironing
ironed - (of linens or clothes) smoothed with a hot iron
Translations

pressed

[prest] ADJ to be pressed for money/timeandar muy escaso de dinero/tiempo
see also hard-pressed

pressed

[ˈprɛst] adj
to be pressed for money (= be short of) → manquer d'argent
I'm really pressed for cash at the moment → Je manque vraiment d'argent en ce moment.
to be pressed for time → être pressé(e)
We are pressed for time → Nous sommes pressés.press gallery ntribune f de presse
References in classic literature ?
Beth took a step forward, and pressed her hands tightly together to keep from clapping them, for this was an irresistible temptation, and the thought of practicing on that splendid instrument quite took her breath away.
By the caress that was in his fingers he ex- pressed himself.
In spite of Ned Newton's cry, Tom's finger pressed the switch-trigger of the electric rifle, for previous experience had taught him that it was sometimes the best thing to awe the natives in out-of-the-way corners of the earth.
Tony ran up to him, caught his hand and pressed it against her cheek.
He fell in love, as men are in the habit of doing, and pressed his suit with an earnestness and an ardor which left nothing to be desired.
Each moment, however, pressed upon him a conviction of the critical situation in which he had suffered his invaluable trust to be involved through his own confidence.
They were two or three prettily written letters, exhaling a faint odor of refinement and of the pressed flowers that peeped from between the loose leaves.
While thus dismissing her, the maiden lady stept forward, kissed Phoebe, and pressed her to her heart, which beat against the girl's bosom with a strong, high, and tumultuous swell.
Again, at the first instant of perceiving that thin visage, and the slight deformity of the figure, she pressed her infant to her bosom with so convulsive a force that the poor babe uttered another cry of pain.
In any case he remained motionless, while I, hearing, as I thought, the sound of some help approaching, pressed against him with redoubled vigour, and continued to shout for assistance.
I did not answer, but instead reached to my side and pressed the little fingers of her I loved where they clung to me for support, and then, in unbroken silence, we sped over the yellow, moonlit moss; each of us occupied with his own thoughts.
He asked me no questions, but gave me some more brandy and water and pressed me to eat.