prester


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prester

(ˈprɛstə)
n
1. (European Myth & Legend) (in mythology) a venomous serpent
2. (Physical Geography) a blazing whirlwind
3. (Anatomy) a vein at the back of the human neck
References in classic literature ?
What mind, that is not wholly barbarous and uncultured, can find pleasure in reading of how a great tower full of knights sails away across the sea like a ship with a fair wind, and will be to-night in Lombardy and to-morrow morning in the land of Prester John of the Indies, or some other that Ptolemy never described nor Marco Polo saw?
Nobody ever asks after you--neither man nor woman; and if I mention your name in company, the men look as if I had spoken of Prester John; and the women sneer covertly.
I have it from my husband, who is a cinquantenier**, at the Parloir-aux Bourgeois, and who was this morning comparing the Flemish ambassadors with those of Prester John and the Emperor of Trebizond, who came from Mesopotamia to Paris, under the last king, and who wore rings in their ears.
Beyond that again is the kingdom of Prester John and of the great Cham.
Its tales of the Ethiopian Prester John, of diamonds that by proper care can be made to grow, of trees whose fruit is an odd sort of lambs, and a hundred other equally remarkable phenomena, are narrated with skilful verisimilitude and still strongly hold the reader's interest, even if they no longer command belief.
Prior Information Notice: Landes riot saxony-anhalt, north pd md, the construction sector 1, sub-measure 2, accommodating gas station at the location 5 alt prester, including dismantling of the old gas station (nml_2).
beaucoup moins que] Avec l'expertise et le savoir-faire de Skema, l'ecole va apporter un plus aux entreprises industrielles, puisqu'elle va prester aussi bien pour les groupes industriels publics que prives [beaucoup plus grand que]
Whether it is the apartment of Sherlock Holmes, the house of Madame Bovary, the lands of Prester John, the ruins of Glastonbury, or the Dublin of Leopold Bloom, the relationship between the imaginary and the real has historically provided us with a sort of forged, altered map of the real as it emerged from the human imagination.
In both novels we detect Eco's cynicism in seeing history as an accumulation of falsehoods and forgeries from the "Donation of Constantine" to the legendary Letter of Prester John, the Corpus Hermeticum, religious relics in the Middle Ages and, more recently, the weapons of mass destruction and the War in Iraq.
The catalogue is marvelously broad, including everything from rhetorico-philosophical scholarly commentaries in the Arabic tradition to the Letter of Prester John, and Rumi to Dante.
The poem opens with a fitful profusion of forms: an italicized voice-over promising relief from unspecified symptoms, in tones that range from the Californian ("from harsh to mellow") to the Prynnish ("tutelary / update deficiency tabs"), yields to a skewed quest scenario, with the narrator accompanied by the mythic and contested figure of Prester John through a space at once pastoral and urban: "steel stairs lead up an embankment.