prestige


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pres·tige

 (prĕ-stēzh′, -stēj′)
n.
1. The level of respect at which a person or thing is regarded by others; standing: an act that boosted his prestige; a job with low prestige.
2. Good reputation; honor: Her accomplishments lent a lot of prestige to the college.
3. Great respect or importance: Doctors are usually treated with prestige.

[French, illusion, magic trick, charm, ability to inspire admiration, prestige, from Latin praestīgiae, tricks, probably alteration of *praestrīgiae, from praestringere, to touch, blunt, blind : prae-, pre- + stringere, to draw tight; see streig- in Indo-European roots.]

prestige

(prɛˈstiːʒ)
n
1. high status or reputation achieved through success, influence, wealth, etc; renown
2.
a. the power to influence or impress; glamour
b. (modifier): a prestige car.
[C17: via French from Latin praestigiae feats of juggling, tricks; apparently related to Latin praestringere to bind tightly, blindfold, from prae before + stringere to draw tight, bind]

pres•tige

(prɛˈstiʒ, -ˈstidʒ)

n.
1. reputation or influence arising from success, achievement, rank, or other favorable attributes.
2. distinction or reputation attaching to a person or thing and thus possessing a cachet for others.
adj.
3. having or showing success, rank, wealth, etc.: a prestige car.
[1820–30; < French (orig. pl.): deceits, juggler's tricks < Latin praestīgiae juggler's tricks]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.prestige - a high standing achieved through success or influence or wealth etc.prestige - a high standing achieved through success or influence or wealth etc.; "he wanted to achieve power and prestige"
standing - social or financial or professional status or reputation; "of equal standing"; "a member in good standing"

prestige

prestige

noun
1. The level of credit or respect at which one is regarded by others:
2. A person's high standing among others:
3. A position of exalted widely recognized importance:
Translations
هَيْبَةٌهَيْبَه، إحْتِرام
prestiž
prestigeanseelse
arvovalta
prestiž
orîstír, álit
名声
명성
prestižas
prestižs
prestíž
ugled
prestige
ความเคารพนบนอบที่เป็นผลมาจากความสำเร็จ
itibarprestijsaygınlık
uy tín

prestige

[presˈtiːʒ] Nprestigio m

prestige

[prɛˈstiːʒ]
nprestige m
modif [job] → de prestige; [car, item] → de prestige

prestige

nPrestige nt; prestige valuePrestigewert m

prestige

[prɛsˈtiːʒ] nprestigio

prestige

(preˈstiːʒ) noun
reputation or influence due to success, rank etc.

prestige

هَيْبَةٌ prestiž prestige Prestige γόητρο prestigio arvovalta prestige prestiž prestigio 名声 명성 prestige prestisje prestiż prestígio престиж prestige ความเคารพนบนอบที่เป็นผลมาจากความสำเร็จ prestij uy tín 声望
References in classic literature ?
He's relying on the prestige he'll get out of this idol of gold if his party finds it," thought on the young inventor.
Carr smiled, and dropped the subject, but it is probable that his daughters' want of sympathy with his acquaintances did not in the least interfere with his social prestige.
No: the reason was this: that from the fatal experiences of the fishery there hung a terrible prestige of perilousness about such a whale as there did about Rinaldo Rinaldini, insomuch that most fishermen were content to recognise him by merely touching their tarpaulins when he would be discovered lounging by them on the sea, without seeking to cultivate a more intimate acquaintance.
With all the bulk of its great wealth and prestige, it swept down upon Bell and his little bodyguard.
It was not a love of the grandiose or the prestige attached to the command of great tonnage, for he continued, with an air of disgust and contempt, "Why, you get flung out of your bunk as likely as not in any sort of heavy weather.
And all these things were dominated by a feminine figure which to my imagination had only a floating outline, now invested with the grace of girlhood, now with the prestige of a woman; and indistinct in both these characters.
By such arts they sometimes entered society on the other side before they did so at home; it was to be added at the same time that this resource was less and less valuable, for Europe, in the American world, had less and less prestige and people in the Western hemisphere now kept a watch on that roundabout road.
In fact, without any one being able to explain the ascendancy which this young girl obtained over all who came in contact with her, she exercised over the little world around her a prestige not unlike that of Bonaparte upon his soldiers.
Ethan was aware that, in regard to the important question of surgical intervention, the female opinion of the neighbourhood was divided, some glorying in the prestige conferred by operations while others shunned them as indelicate.
If we made a false prophecy on such a subject, our prestige would be gone for ever, and so would Ignosi's chance of the throne of the Kukuanas.
Strickland, and at the same time gave her not a little prestige.
The hieroglyph deserts the cathedral, and betakes itself to blazoning the donjon keep, in order to lend prestige to feudalism.