presume


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pre·sume

 (prĭ-zo͞om′)
v. pre·sumed, pre·sum·ing, pre·sumes
v.tr.
1. To take for granted as being true in the absence of proof to the contrary: "I presume you're tired after the long ride" (Edith Wharton).
2. To constitute reasonable evidence for assuming; appear to prove: A signed hotel bill presumes occupancy of a room.
3. To venture without authority or permission; dare: He presumed to invite himself to dinner.
v.intr.
1. To take for granted that something is true or factual; make a supposition.
2. To act presumptuously or take unwarranted advantage of something: Don't presume on their hospitality.

[Middle English presumen, from Old French presumer, from Late Latin praesūmere, from Latin, to anticipate : prae-, pre- + sūmere, to take; see em- in Indo-European roots.]

pre·sum′ed·ly (-zo͞o′mĭd-lē) adv.
pre·sum′er n.

presume

(prɪˈzjuːm)
vb
1. (when tr, often takes a clause as object) to take (something) for granted; assume
2. (when tr, often foll by an infinitive) to take upon oneself (to do something) without warrant or permission; dare: do you presume to copy my work?.
3. (intr; foll by on or upon) to rely or depend: don't presume on his agreement.
4. (Law) law to take as proved until contrary evidence is produced
[C14: via Old French from Latin praesūmere to take in advance, from prae before + sūmere to assume]
presumedly adv
preˈsumer n
preˈsuming adj
preˈsumingly adv

pre•sume

(prɪˈzum)

v. -sumed, -sum•ing. v.t.
1. to take for granted, assume, or suppose.
2. Law. to assume as true in the absence of proof to the contrary.
3. to undertake with unwarrantable boldness.
4. to undertake (to do something) without right or permission: to presume to speak for another person.
v.i.
5. to take something for granted; suppose.
6. to act or proceed with unwarrantable or impertinent boldness.
7. to go too far in acting unwarrantably or in taking liberties (usu. fol. by on or upon): to presume on someone's tolerance.
[1300–50; Middle English (< Old French presumer) < Latin praesūmere to take beforehand (Late Latin: take for granted, assume, dare) =prae- pre- + sūmere to take up, suppose (see consume)]
pre•sum′ed•ly, adv.
pre•sum′er, n.

presume


Past participle: presumed
Gerund: presuming

Imperative
presume
presume
Present
I presume
you presume
he/she/it presumes
we presume
you presume
they presume
Preterite
I presumed
you presumed
he/she/it presumed
we presumed
you presumed
they presumed
Present Continuous
I am presuming
you are presuming
he/she/it is presuming
we are presuming
you are presuming
they are presuming
Present Perfect
I have presumed
you have presumed
he/she/it has presumed
we have presumed
you have presumed
they have presumed
Past Continuous
I was presuming
you were presuming
he/she/it was presuming
we were presuming
you were presuming
they were presuming
Past Perfect
I had presumed
you had presumed
he/she/it had presumed
we had presumed
you had presumed
they had presumed
Future
I will presume
you will presume
he/she/it will presume
we will presume
you will presume
they will presume
Future Perfect
I will have presumed
you will have presumed
he/she/it will have presumed
we will have presumed
you will have presumed
they will have presumed
Future Continuous
I will be presuming
you will be presuming
he/she/it will be presuming
we will be presuming
you will be presuming
they will be presuming
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been presuming
you have been presuming
he/she/it has been presuming
we have been presuming
you have been presuming
they have been presuming
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been presuming
you will have been presuming
he/she/it will have been presuming
we will have been presuming
you will have been presuming
they will have been presuming
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been presuming
you had been presuming
he/she/it had been presuming
we had been presuming
you had been presuming
they had been presuming
Conditional
I would presume
you would presume
he/she/it would presume
we would presume
you would presume
they would presume
Past Conditional
I would have presumed
you would have presumed
he/she/it would have presumed
we would have presumed
you would have presumed
they would have presumed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.presume - take to be the case or to be true; accept without verification or proof; "I assume his train was late"
presuppose, suppose - take for granted or as a given; suppose beforehand; "I presuppose that you have done your work"
anticipate, expect - regard something as probable or likely; "The meteorologists are expecting rain for tomorrow"
2.presume - take upon oneselfpresume - take upon oneself; act presumptuously, without permission; "How dare you call my lawyer?"
act, move - perform an action, or work out or perform (an action); "think before you act"; "We must move quickly"; "The governor should act on the new energy bill"; "The nanny acted quickly by grabbing the toddler and covering him with a wet towel"
3.presume - constitute reasonable evidence for; "A restaurant bill presumes the consumption of food"
bear witness, evidence, testify, prove, show - provide evidence for; "The blood test showed that he was the father"; "Her behavior testified to her incompetence"
4.presume - take liberties or act with too much confidence
behave, act, do - behave in a certain manner; show a certain behavior; conduct or comport oneself; "You should act like an adult"; "Don't behave like a fool"; "What makes her do this way?"; "The dog acts ferocious, but he is really afraid of people"

presume

verb
1. believe, think, suppose, assume, guess (informal, chiefly U.S. & Canad.), take it, take for granted, infer, conjecture, postulate, surmise, posit, presuppose I presume you're here on business.
2. dare, venture, undertake, go so far as, have the audacity, take the liberty, make bold, make so bold as I wouldn't presume to question your judgement.
3. presuppose, assume, imply, take as read The legal definition of 'know' often presumes mental control.
presume on something or someone depend on, rely on, exploit, take advantage of, count on, bank on, take liberties with, trust in or to He's presuming on your good nature.
Quotations
"Dr. Livingstone, I presume?" [Henry Morton Stanley How I Found Livingstone]

presume

verb
1. To take for granted without proof:
Informal: reckon.
2. To have the courage to put forward, as an idea, especially when rebuff or criticism is likely:
3. To take advantage of unfairly:
Translations
يَجْرُؤيُفْتَرَضُ أنَّيَفْتَرِض وجود شَيء
předpokládatdovolit si
antageformodevove
olettaaotaksua
pretpostaviti
gyanít
gera ráî fyrirleyfa sér, dirfast
推定する
추정하다
perdėtas pasitikėjimas savimipernelyg įžūlusprezumpcijaturbūt
domātpieņemtuzdrīkstētiesuzskatīt
domnevati
antaförmoda
เชื่อว่าเป็นจริง
giả sử

presume

[prɪˈzjuːm]
A. VT
1. (= suppose) → suponer, presumir
his death must be presumedes de suponer que ha muerto, hay que presumir que ha muerto
to presume thatsuponer que ...
it may be presumed thates de suponer que ...
to presume sb to be innocentsuponer que algn es inocente
Dr Livingstone, I presumeDr Livingstone según creo
2. (= venture) to presume to do sthatreverse a hacer algo
I wouldn't presume to question your judgementno me atrevería a poner en duda su buen criterio
if I may presume to advise yousi me permite ofrecerle un consejo
B. VI
1. (= suppose) → suponer
2. (= take liberties) to presume on sb's friendshipabusar de la amistad de algn
you presume too muchno sabes lo que pides, pides demasiado

presume

[prɪˈzjuːm] vt
(= suppose) → présumer
to presume (that) ... → présumer que ...
I presume you're here on business → Je présume que vous êtes ici pour affaires.
I presume so → je présume que oui
to be presumed dead → être présumé mort
(= dare) to presume to do sth → se permettre de faire qch

presume

vt
(= suppose)annehmen, vermuten; sb’s deathunterstellen (form); presumed deadmutmaßlich verstorben; to be presumed innocentals unschuldig gelten; he is presumed to be living in Spaines wird vermutet, dass er in Spanien lebt
(= venture) to presume to do somethingsich (dat)erlauben or sich (dat)herausnehmen or sich erdreisten, etw zu tun
vi
(= suppose)annehmen, vermuten; Dr Livingstone, I presumeDr. Livingstone, wie ich annehme; it was his decision, I presumeich nehme an or vermute, das war seine Entscheidung; I presume notich glaube nein
(= take liberties, be presumptuous) I didn’t want to presumeich wollte nicht aufdringlich sein; you presume too muchSie sind wirklich vermessen; to presume on or upon somethingetw überbeanspruchen

presume

[prɪˈzjuːm]
1. vt
a. (suppose) to presume (that)supporre (che), presumere (che)
I presume she'll come → suppongo che verrà
I presume he did it → suppongo che l'abbia fatto
b. (frm) (venture) to presume to do sthpermettersi di fare qc
2. vi (frm) (take liberties) → prendersi troppe libertà
to presume on sb's friendship → approfittarsi dell'amicizia di qn

presume

(prəˈzjuːm) verb
1. to believe that something is true without proof; to take for granted. When I found the room empty, I presumed that you had gone home; `Has he gone?' `I presume so.'
2. to be bold enough (to act without the right, knowledge etc to do so). I wouldn't presume to advise someone as clever as you.
preˈsumably adverb
I presume. She's not in her office – presumably she went home early.
preˈsumption (-ˈzamp-) noun
1. something presumed. She married again, on the presumption that her first husband was dead.
2. unsuitable boldness, eg in one's behaviour towards another person.
preˈsumptuous (-ˈzamptjuəs) , ((American) -ˈzamptʃuəs) adjective
impolitely bold.
preˈsumptuousness noun

presume

يُفْتَرَضُ أنَّ předpokládat antage annehmen υποθέτω suponer olettaa supposer pretpostaviti presumere 推定する 추정하다 veronderstellen ta for gitt przypuścić presumir предполагать anta เชื่อว่าเป็นจริง farzetmek giả sử 假定
References in classic literature ?
I know what your object is, as I presume you do mine.
That were impossible," returned the young man; "he called you by a thousand endearing epithets, that I may not presume to use, but to the justice of which, I can warmly testify.
I presume, if you had not met me just now, we should none of us have seen you again?
The family-party of the defunct Pyncheons, we presume, goes off in this wise.
Nevertheless, vixenly as she looks, many people are seeking at this very moment to shelter themselves under the wing of the federal eagle; imagining, I presume, that her bosom has all the softness and snugness of an eiderdown pillow.
It was fair to presume that being a harpooneer, his linen or woollen, as the case might be, would not be of the tidiest, certainly none of the finest.
Yet not to speak of the peril of the thing, it is to be doubted whether this course is always the best; for it is but reasonable to presume, that the longer the stricken whale stays under water, the more he is exhausted.
I am the bolder to speak of it here, because I presume that there are one or two such roads in every town.
He was generally called Captain Anthony--a title which, I presume, he acquired by sailing a craft on the Chesapeake Bay.
It is a great pleasure where one can indulge in it," said the young man, "though there are not many houses that I should presume on so far; but in coming home I felt I might do any thing.
Reed, I presume, from after-occurrences, that the apothecary ventured to recommend my being sent to school; and the recommendation was no doubt readily enough adopted; for as Abbot said, in discussing the subject with Bessie when both sat sewing in the nursery one night, after I was in bed, and, as they thought, asleep, "Missis was, she dared say, glad enough to get rid of such a tiresome, ill- conditioned child, who always looked as if she were watching everybody, and scheming plots underhand.
I presume, because, with that face, I'm sure you cannot help being good-hearted.