presumption


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

pre·sump·tion

 (prĭ-zŭmp′shən)
n.
1. Behavior or attitude that is boldly arrogant or offensive; effrontery: She was offended at the stranger's presumption in speaking in such an casual manner.
2. The act of presuming or accepting something as true: the presumption of innocence of the accused.
3. A condition or basis for accepting or presuming something.
4. Law A conclusion applied by law as to the correctness of some fact, ordinarily subject to rebuttal by contrary evidence.

[Middle English presumpcion, from Old French, from Late Latin praesūmptiō, praesūmptiōn-, from Latin, anticipation, from praesūmptus, past participle of praesūmere, to anticipate; see presume.]

presumption

(prɪˈzʌmpʃən)
n
1. the act of presuming
2. bold or insolent behaviour or manners
3. a belief or assumption based on reasonable evidence
4. a ground or basis on which to presume
5. (Law) law an inference of the truth of a fact from other facts proved, admitted, or judicially noticed
[C13: via Old French from Latin praesumptiō a using in advance, anticipation, from praesūmere to take beforehand; see presume]

pre•sump•tion

(prɪˈzʌmp ʃən)

n.
1. the act of presuming.
2. belief on reasonable grounds or probable evidence.
3. something that is presumed; an assumption.
4. a ground or reason for presuming or believing.
5. Law. an inference permitted as to the existence of one fact from proof of the existence of other facts.
6. an assumption, often not fully established, that is taken for granted.
7. unwarrantable or impertinent boldness; audacity; effrontery.
[1175–1225; Middle English: effrontery, supposition < Latin praesūmptiō anticipation, supposition]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.presumption - an assumption that is taken for granted
supposal, supposition, assumption - a hypothesis that is taken for granted; "any society is built upon certain assumptions"
2.presumption - (law) an inference of the truth of a fact from other facts proved or admitted or judicially noticed
illation, inference - the reasoning involved in drawing a conclusion or making a logical judgment on the basis of circumstantial evidence and prior conclusions rather than on the basis of direct observation
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
3.presumption - audacious (even arrogant) behavior that you have no right to; "he despised them for their presumptuousness"
audaciousness, audacity - aggressive boldness or unmitigated effrontery; "he had the audacity to question my decision"
uppishness, uppityness - assumption of airs beyond one's station
4.presumption - a kind of discourtesy in the form of an act of presuming; "his presumption was intolerable"
offense, offensive activity, discourtesy, offence - a lack of politeness; a failure to show regard for others; wounding the feelings or others

presumption

noun
1. assumption, opinion, belief, guess, hypothesis, anticipation, conjecture, surmise, supposition, presupposition, premiss the presumption that a defendant is innocent until proved guilty
2. cheek (informal), front, neck (informal), nerve (informal), assurance, brass (informal), gall (informal), audacity, boldness, temerity, chutzpah (U.S. & Canad. informal), insolence, impudence, effrontery, brass neck (Brit. informal), sassiness (U.S. informal), presumptuousness, forwardness He had the presumption to answer me back.

presumption

noun
Translations
إفْتِراضتَجَرُّؤ، تَطاوُل
předpokladtroufalost
arroganceformodning
ályktunósvífni
trúfalosť

presumption

[prɪˈzʌmpʃən] N
1. (= arrogance) → presunción f; (= liberty-taking) → atrevimiento m
pardon my presumptionle ruego perdone mi atrevimiento
2. (= thing presumed) → suposición f, presunción f
the presumption is thatse supone que ..., es de suponer que ...

presumption

[prɪˈzʌmpʃən] n
(= assumption) → présomption f
presumption of innocence → présomption d'innocence
to make presumptions → faire des suppositions
(= boldness) → audace f

presumption

n
(= assumption)Annahme f, → Vermutung f; the presumption is that …es wird angenommen or man vermutet, dass …; presumption of death/innocenceTodes-/Unschuldvermutung f
(= boldness, arrogance)Unverschämtheit f, → Dreistigkeit f; (in connection with one’s abilities) → Überheblichkeit f, → Anmaßung f, → Vermessenheit f (geh)

presumption

[prɪˈzʌmpʃn] n
a. (arrogance) → presunzione f; (impudence) → audacia
b. (thing presumed) → supposizione f
there is a strong presumption that ... → tutto fa supporre or presumere che...

presume

(prəˈzjuːm) verb
1. to believe that something is true without proof; to take for granted. When I found the room empty, I presumed that you had gone home; `Has he gone?' `I presume so.'
2. to be bold enough (to act without the right, knowledge etc to do so). I wouldn't presume to advise someone as clever as you.
preˈsumably adverb
I presume. She's not in her office – presumably she went home early.
preˈsumption (-ˈzamp-) noun
1. something presumed. She married again, on the presumption that her first husband was dead.
2. unsuitable boldness, eg in one's behaviour towards another person.
preˈsumptuous (-ˈzamptjuəs) , ((American) -ˈzamptʃuəs) adjective
impolitely bold.
preˈsumptuousness noun
References in classic literature ?
So saying he handed the other a check, which the District Attorney carefully examined, and then pronounced it the most complete absence of both proof and presumption that he had ever seen.
He might have doubled his presumption to me but poor Harriet
At first, indeed, she had seemed to take a pleasure in mortifying my vanity and crushing my presumption - relentlessly nipping off bud by bud as they ventured to appear; and then, I confess, I was deeply wounded, though, at the same time, stimulated to seek revenge; - but latterly finding, beyond a doubt, that I was not that empty-headed coxcomb she had first supposed me, she had repulsed my modest advances in quite a different spirit.
I do not suppose you will have the presumption to set it to rights -- that would be to accuse Her Majesty, Queen Anne, of falsehood.
I was shocked, not perhaps so much shocked as disillusioned, for though I had always suspicioned Mary A as one who harboured the craziest ambitions when she looked most humble, of such presumption as this I had never thought her capable.
He admitted the presumption, but then it would be presumption of any man to lift his eyes to her.
your presumption in saying you have resigned all pretensions to a
Ye long (it almost seemeth so to me--forgive my presumption, ye higher men)--
Unless we presume at the same time that the powers of the general government will be worse administered than those of the State government, there seems to be no room for the presumption of ill-will, disaffection, or opposition in the people.
He had as yet heard nothing of the success of the previous expeditions, and had to proceed upon the presumption that everything had been effected according to his instructions.
I am almost ashamed to make the request, though its presumption would certainly appear greater to every creature in Bath than yourself.
In the broad hint which he dropped respecting the daughter of Waldemar Fitzurse, John had more than one motive, each the offspring of a mind, which was a strange mixture of carelessness and presumption with low artifice and cunning.