presumptuousness


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Related to presumptuousness: plausible

pre·sump·tu·ous

 (prĭ-zŭmp′cho͞o-əs)
adj.
Going beyond what is right or proper; excessively forward: felt it was presumptuous of him to assume they had become friends.

[Middle English, from Old French presumptueux, from Late Latin praesūmptuōsus, variant of praesūmptiōsus, from praesūmptiō, presumption; see presumption.]

pre·sump′tu·ous·ly adv.
pre·sump′tu·ous·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.presumptuousness - audacious (even arrogant) behavior that you have no right to; "he despised them for their presumptuousness"
audaciousness, audacity - aggressive boldness or unmitigated effrontery; "he had the audacity to question my decision"
uppishness, uppityness - assumption of airs beyond one's station

presumptuousness

noun
Translations
تَجاسُر، وَقاحَه، قِلَّة حَياء
drzost
indbildskhed
önhittség
ósvífni
haddini bilmezlikküstahlık

presumptuousness

[prɪˈzʌmptjʊəsnɪs] N (= arrogance) → presunción f; (= liberty-taking) → atrevimiento m

presumptuousness

n (of person, remark)Unverschämtheit f, → Dreistigkeit f; (in connection with one’s abilities) → Überheblichkeit f, → Anmaßung f, → Vermessenheit f (geh); (of behaviour)Unverschämtheit f

presume

(prəˈzjuːm) verb
1. to believe that something is true without proof; to take for granted. When I found the room empty, I presumed that you had gone home; `Has he gone?' `I presume so.'
2. to be bold enough (to act without the right, knowledge etc to do so). I wouldn't presume to advise someone as clever as you.
preˈsumably adverb
I presume. She's not in her office – presumably she went home early.
preˈsumption (-ˈzamp-) noun
1. something presumed. She married again, on the presumption that her first husband was dead.
2. unsuitable boldness, eg in one's behaviour towards another person.
preˈsumptuous (-ˈzamptjuəs) , ((American) -ˈzamptʃuəs) adjective
impolitely bold.
preˈsumptuousness noun
References in classic literature ?
Thus doth the master give free scope to his slaves, and even enjoyeth their presumptuousness.
It's about Hillary Clinton: her presumptuousness, the whole email mess, the sloppy administration of the Clinton Foundation, the sense that scandals are as inextricable from her political identity as pantsuits.
I hope you forgive the presumptuousness but let me try to help.
But that still doesn't manage to come close to Gonde's biggest misstep here - to take a factual tragedy, not to mention one that to this day remains very raw to the loved ones of those affected, and turn it into an a Skins-meets-Strindberg smorgasbord of pretension and presumptuousness.
By no means do the new data laws mean that Big Brother will be able to access our information whenever he likes, so maybe we can relax a bit, but there is a presumptuousness to this legislation that is pretty unsavoury.
Freud reiterates: "The crime which was thrown onto his shoulders, presumptuousness and rebelliousness against a great authority, was precisely the crime for which the members of the Chorus, the company of brothers, were responsible.
Perhaps it's the presumptuousness of people who know nothing about guns lecturing the rest of us on their responsible use and handling.
Elia's middle-class presumptuousness in the "Complaint" is undermined when he admits his own poverty and hints at his imposter status.
Dante, too, is tested, and his own poetic-prophetic pretensions are in danger of showing up as blatant presumptuousness by the test of Christ's uniqueness and the incomparable, singular event of the Crucifixion.
Beyond setting forth known facts and probable truths about his life, these bio-fictional plays, novels, and films might be classified according to the degree of their presumptuousness about what cannot possibly be known: Moliere's innermost thoughts and feelings, particularly those concerning the women in his life.
The presumptuousness is compounded when the idea is to reconstitute the society into a mirror image of the superpower.
And it's not just the inconvenience of the visit, but it's the presumptuousness of it, agrees Terry Apter, author of "What Do You Want From Me?