pretelevision

pretelevision

(ˌpriːtɛlɪˈvɪʒən)
adj
1. (Broadcasting) occurring before the arrival of television
2. (Historical Terms) occurring before the arrival of television
References in periodicals archive ?
And I think there's a way in which those definitions of positive and negative serve in many ways to dehumanize us, and for me are as problematic as the more blatant racist caricatures of for instance the pretelevision age.
Radio use is also examined here, although it lacks theoretical underpinnings, because radio use, despite its powerful role in the Western pretelevision media environment earlier in the 20th century, has provided few significant results in the modern era (Chaffee, Zhao, & Leshner, 1994; Weaver & Drew, 1995).
Box office returns also became more volatile than in the pretelevision years.
The rhetoric of this extract indicates that Doloughan was aware of the audience appetite for the Coronation film, and in the years before the widespread take up of television, this was an example of the Rural Cinema Scheme exploiting the opportunity of the pretelevision audience, with recorded coverage of national events on 16mm film.
During Sheen's pretelevision era, he had often focused on events in Europe.
They also learned about East Coast and Midwest officiating - not insignificant, in a pretelevision era, when rules interpretations and styles of play varied from region to region - and the modifications to sleeping cars needed to accommodate Wintermute's long legs.
where they were discovered by the narrator, there is little to entertain them: no television in this pretelevision age, no football, not even movie theaters because the settlements are small.
While there were other popular sports in the pretelevision era, such as horse racing, boxing, college football, and track and field, baseball monopolized the sports industry as America's major sport.
Gloria remembers: "It was in pretelevision Northern Ireland, shock horror that long ago, and home-spun entertainment was huge.
Large numbers of people in this pretelevision era turned to reading.
Additionally, this flavor of pretelevision America is tangible in Frank Keating's earlier biography Will Rogers, and the transition from vaudeville to movies is demonstrated humorously in a new picture book about Mack Sennett, Mack Made Movies.