pretender


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pre·tend·er

 (prĭ-tĕn′dər)
n.
1. One who simulates, pretends, or alleges falsely; a hypocrite or dissembler.
2. One who sets forth a claim, especially a claimant to a throne.

pretender

(prɪˈtɛndə)
n
1. a person who pretends or makes false allegations
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a person who mounts a claim, as to a throne or title

pre•tend•er

(prɪˈtɛn dər)

n.
1. a person who pretends, esp. for a dishonest purpose.
2. an aspirant or claimant (often fol. by to): a pretender to the throne.
3. a person who makes unjustified or false claims.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Pretender - a claimant to the throne or to the office of ruler (usually without just title)
claimant - someone who claims a benefit or right or title; "claimants of unemployment compensation"; "he was a claimant to the throne"
2.pretender - a person who makes deceitful pretensespretender - a person who makes deceitful pretenses
beguiler, cheater, deceiver, trickster, slicker, cheat - someone who leads you to believe something that is not true
name dropper - someone who pretends that famous people are his/her friends
ringer - a contestant entered in a competition under false pretenses
3.pretender - a person who professes beliefs and opinions that he or she does not hold in order to conceal his or her real feelings or motivespretender - a person who professes beliefs and opinions that he or she does not hold in order to conceal his or her real feelings or motives
beguiler, cheater, deceiver, trickster, slicker, cheat - someone who leads you to believe something that is not true
charmer, smoothie, smoothy, sweet talker - someone with an assured and ingratiating manner
Tartufe, Tartuffe - a hypocrite who pretends to religious piety (after the protagonist in a play by Moliere)
whited sepulcher, whited sepulchre - a person who is inwardly evil but outwardly professes to be virtuous

pretender

noun claimant, claimer, aspirant the Comte de Paris, pretender to the French throne

pretender

noun
2. One who sets forth a claim to a royal title:
Translations

pretender

[prɪˈtendəʳ] Npretendiente mf
pretender to the thronepretendiente mf al trono
the Young Pretenderel joven Pretendiente

pretender

[prɪˈtɛndər] nprétendant(e) m/f
pretender to sth → prétendant à qch

pretender

n (to throne) → Prätendent(in) m(f) (→ to auf +acc)

pretender

[prɪˈtɛndəʳ] n (to the throne) → pretendente m/f
References in classic literature ?
The eyes of all present, which had hitherto been gravely scanning the person of Duncan, were now turned, on the instant, toward the upright iron frame of this new pretender to the distinguished appellation.
This man is a pretender, and ignorant, else he had known that that weapon can be used in but eight bouts only, and then it vanisheth away to its home under the sea.
But, it was only the pleasanter to turn to Biddy and to Joe, whose great forbearance shone more brightly than before, if that could be, contrasted with this brazen pretender.
But it is necessary to know well how to disguise this characteristic, and to be a great pretender and dissembler; and men are so simple, and so subject to present necessities, that he who seeks to deceive will always find someone who will allow himself to be deceived.
In her handling a ship will not put up with a mere pretender, as, for instance, the public will do with Mr.
Palfrey was capable of horse-whipping a too rash pretender to his daughter's hand; and, moreover, he had three tall sons: it was clear that a suitor would be at a disadvantage with such a family, unless travel and natural acumen had given him a countervailing power of contrivance.
Nor should I like to be obliged myself, to send to your prince his million left here by you, for then it would be said, and with some reason, that I paid the Pretender to enable him to make war against the parliament.
Further on, a young scamp was taking a lesson in epilepsy from an old pretender, who was instructing him in the art of foaming at the mouth, by chewing a morsel of soap.
The whole extent of his fault was revealed to him at simple sight of the pretender.
Although she had blunted her taste upon some form of philanthropy for twenty-five years, she had a fine natural instinct for an upstart or a pretender, and knew to a hairbreadth what literature should be and what it should not be.
Engaging, heart and soul, in his pursuits of sowing, planting, and gathering, Van Baerle, caressed by the whole fraternity of tulip-growers in Europe, entertained nor the least suspicion that there was at his very door a pretender whose throne he had usurped.
In his despondency, he concluded that he had no judgment whatever, that he was hypnotized by what he wrote, and that he was a self- deluded pretender.