pretension


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pre·ten·sion

 (prĭ-tĕn′shən)
n.
1. A specious allegation; a pretext: "the pretension that current political arrangements serve everyone's interests" (Steven Pinker).
2.
a. A claim to something, such as a skill or profession: a writer's pretensions to journalistic detachment.
b. The advancing of such a claim: tried to prevent his pretensions to the throne.
3.
a. The unwarranted assumption that one is deserving of merit, or behavior indicative of such an assumption; pretentiousness: "the popular association of wine with snobbery and pretension" (Paul Lukacs).
b. An instance of pretentiousness: "[He] was a likable, boyish man from a middle-class Southern background, though his aristocratic manner and pretensions suggested otherwise" (Mary V. Dearborn).

pretension

(prɪˈtɛnʃən)
n
1. (often plural) a false or unsupportable claim, esp to merit, worth, or importance
2. a specious or unfounded allegation; pretext
3. the state or quality of being pretentious

pre•ten•sion

(prɪˈtɛn ʃən)

n.
1. the laying of a claim to something.
2. a claim or title to something.
3. Often, pretensions. a claim made, often indirectly or by implication, to some quality, merit, dignity, or importance.
4. the act of pretending or alleging.
5. an allegation of doubtful veracity.
6. a pretext.
[1590–1600; < Medieval Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pretension - a false or unsupportable quality
artificiality - the quality of being produced by people and not occurring naturally
2.pretension - the advancing of a claim; "his pretension to the crown"; "the town still puts forward pretensions as a famous resort"
claim - an assertion of a right (as to money or property); "his claim asked for damages"
3.pretension - the quality of being pretentious (behaving or speaking in such a manner as to create a false appearance of great importance or worth)
unnaturalness - the quality of being unnatural or not based on natural principles
ostentation - pretentious or showy or vulgar display

pretension

noun
2. (usually plural) aspiration, claim, demand, profession, assumption, assertion, pretence one of the few fashion designers who does not have pretensions to be an artist

pretension

noun
1. A professed rather than a real reason:
2. A legitimate or supposed right to demand something as one's rightful due:
Slang: dibs.
3. Boastful self-importance or display:
Translations
PrätentionRecht

pretension

[prɪˈtenʃən] N
1. (= claim) → pretensión f
to have pretensions to culturetener pretensiones de cultura, pretender ser culto
2. (= pretentiousness) → presunción f, pretenciosidad f

pretension

[prɪˈtɛnʃən] n
(= affectation) → prétention
the pretensions of the art world → les prétentions du monde artistique
lack of pretension → absence de prétention
without pretension → sans prétention
(= claim) → prétention f
to have no pretensions to sth → n'avoir aucune prétention à qch
to have no pretensions to being sth → n'avoir aucune prétention à être qch

pretension

n
(= claim)Anspruch m; (social, cultural) → Ambition f; he makes no pretension(s) to originalityer beansprucht keineswegs, originell zu sein
(= ostentation)Prahlerei f, → Protzerei f (pej inf); (= affectation)Anmaßung f

pretension

[prɪˈtɛnʃn] n (claim) → pretesa
to have no pretensions to sth/to being sth → non avere la pretesa di avere qc/di essere qc
References in classic literature ?
Oh, I've no pretension," I could laugh, "to being the only one.
He was a short, thick-set man, with coarse, commonplace features, and that swaggering air of pretension which marks a low man who is trying to elbow his way upward in the world.
During his present short stay, Emma had barely seen him; but just enough to feel that the first meeting was over, and to give her the impression of his not being improved by the mixture of pique and pretension, now spread over his air.
I have seen in his face a far different expression from that which hardens it now while she is so vivaciously accosting him; but then it came of itself: it was not elicited by meretricious arts and calculated manoeuvres; and one had but to accept it--to answer what he asked without pretension, to address him when needful without grimace--and it increased and grew kinder and more genial, and warmed one like a fostering sunbeam.
Except this, he has no pretension to nobility, and calls himself a chance count, although the general opinion at Rome is that the count is a man of very high distinction.
From all this it resulted that the false and selfish called her wise, the vulgar and debased termed her charitable, the insolent and unjust dubbed her amiable, the conscientious and benevolent generally at first accepted as valid her claim to be considered one of themselves; but ere long the plating of pretension wore off, the real material appeared below, and they laid her aside as a deception.
They already began to consider themselves on a par with the M'Tavishes, the M'Gillivrays, the Frobishers, and the other magnates of the Northwest, whom they had been accustomed to look up to as the great ones of the earth; and they were a little disposed, perhaps, to wear their suddenly-acquired honors with some air of pretension.
Her behaviour, I confess, has been calculated to do away with such an idea; I have not detected the smallest impropriety in it--nothing of vanity, of pretension, of levity; and she is altogether so attractive that I should not wonder at his being delighted with her, had he known nothing of her previous to this personal acquaintance; but, against reason, against conviction, to be so well pleased with her, as I am sure he is, does really astonish me.
Miss Tilney had a good figure, a pretty face, and a very agreeable countenance; and her air, though it had not all the decided pretension, the resolute stylishness of Miss Thorpe's, had more real elegance.
Her drawing-room, in a flat on Chelsea embankment, has three windows looking on the river; and the ceiling is not so lofty as it would be in an older house of the same pretension.
I made no pretension to 'a mother's watchful, anxious care,' but I was amazed and horrified at Mrs.
Not one of them could call to mind the innumerable instances in which the sexual influence has proved irresistible in the persons of women without even the pretension to beauty.