pretentious


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pre·ten·tious

 (prĭ-tĕn′shəs)
adj.
1. Claiming that or behaving as if one is important or deserving of merit when such is not the case: a pretentious socialite.
2. Showing or betraying an attitude of superiority: made pretentious remarks about his education.
3. Marked by an extravagant or presumptuous outward show; ostentatious: a pretentious house. See Synonyms at showy.

pre·ten′tious·ly adv.
pre·ten′tious·ness n.

pretentious

(prɪˈtɛnʃəs)
adj
1. making claim to distinction or importance, esp undeservedly
2. having or creating a deceptive outer appearance of great worth; ostentatious
preˈtentiously adv
preˈtentiousness n

pre•ten•tious

(prɪˈtɛn ʃəs)

adj.
1. full of pretension; characterized by the assumption of dignity, importance, artistic distinction, etc.
2. making an exaggerated outward show; ostentatious; showy.
[1835–45; earlier pretensious. See pretense, -ious]
pre•ten′tious•ly, adv.
pre•ten′tious•ness, n.
syn: See bombastic. See also grandiose.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.pretentious - making claim to or creating an appearance of (often undeserved) importance or distinction; "a pretentious country house"; "a pretentious fraud"; "a pretentious scholarly edition"
tasteless - lacking aesthetic or social taste
unpretentious - lacking pretension or affectation; "an unpretentious country church"; "her quiet unpretentious demeanor"
2.pretentious - intended to attract notice and impress others; "an ostentatious sable coat"
3.pretentious - (of a display) tawdry or vulgar
tasteless - lacking aesthetic or social taste

pretentious

pretentious

adjective
1. Characterized by an exaggerated show of dignity or self-importance:
Informal: highfalutin.
2. Marked by outward, often extravagant display:
Translations
pretenţios

pretentious

[prɪˈtenʃəs] ADJ (= affected) → pretencioso; (= ostentatious and vulgar) → cursi

pretentious

[prɪˈtɛnʃəs] adjprétentieux/euse

pretentious

adj (= pretending to be important)anmaßend; speech, style, bookhochtrabend, hochgestochen; (= ostentatious)angeberisch, protzig (inf), → großkotzig (inf); house, restaurant, décorpompös, bombastisch

pretentious

[prɪˈtɛnʃəs] adjpretenzioso/a
References in classic literature ?
She sold all her property excepting the farm of Toucques and the farm of Geffosses, the income of which barely amounted to 5,000 francs; then she left her house in Saint-Melaine, and moved into a less pretentious one which had belonged to her ancestors and stood back of the market-place.
Hargrave; she is a hard, pretentious, worldly-minded woman.
If the Chateau de Vaux possessed a single fault with which it could be reproached, it was its grand, pretentious character.
They flanked opposite ends of the house and were probably architectural absurdities, redeemed in a measure indeed by not being wholly disengaged nor of a height too pretentious, dating, in their gingerbread antiquity, from a romantic revival that was already a respectable past.
I accompanied Sola and Dejah Thoris in a search for new quarters, which we found in a building nearer the audience chamber and of far more pretentious architecture than our former habitation.
I had to endure from him neither cold neglect, irritating interference, nor pretentious assumption of superiority.
Philip, looking across the cemetery crowded on all sides with monuments, some poor and simple, others vulgar, pretentious, and ugly, shuddered.
Mary's poor pretentious babe screamed continually, with a note of exultation in his din, as if he thought he was devoting himself to a life of pleasure, and often the last sound I heard as I got me out of the street was his haw-haw-haw, delivered triumphantly as if it were some entirely new thing, though he must have learned it like a parrot.
If Shakspeare came to life again, and talked of playwriting, the first pretentious nobody who sat opposite at dinner would differ with him as composedly as he might differ with you and me.
The restaurant was not so showy or pretentious as the one further down Broadway, which he always preferred, but it was nearly so.
But at last it was the turn of the good old-fashioned dance which has the least of vanity and the most of merriment in it, and Maggie quite forgot her troublous life in a childlike enjoyment of that half-rustic rhythm which seems to banish pretentious etiquette.
drawing still nearer to Mazarin, under the pretext of gaining a better point of view, "look at that simple white dress by the side of those antiquated specimens of finery, and those pretentious coiffures.