preterite

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past tense

The past tense is used to describe or indicate an action that began in the past. Depending on how we form the past tense, it might describe actions that happened or were completed in the past, were occurring at the same time as something else in the past, or continued to happen until or near the present time.
There are four forms of the Past Tense that can accomplish these tasks.
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pret·er·ite

or pret·er·it  (prĕt′ər-ĭt)
adj.
Of, relating to, or being the verb tense that describes a past action or state.
n.
1. The verb form expressing or describing a past action or condition.
2. A verb in the preterite form.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin (tempus) praeteritum, past (tense), neuter past participle of praeterīre, to go by : praeter, beyond, comparative of prae, before; see per in Indo-European roots + īre, to go; see ei- in Indo-European roots.]

preterite

(ˈprɛtərɪt) grammar or

preterit

n
1. (Grammar) a tense of verbs used to relate past action, formed in English by inflection of the verb, as jumped, swam
2. (Grammar) a verb in this tense
adj
(Grammar) denoting this tense
[C14: from Late Latin praeteritum (tempus) past (time, tense), from Latin praeterīre to go by, from preter- + īre to go]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.preterite - a term formerly used to refer to the simple past tense
past tense, past - a verb tense that expresses actions or states in the past
Translations
preterit
preteritum

preterite

[ˈpretərɪt] N (Ling) → pretérito m

preterite

[ˈpretərɪt] nprétérit m

preterite

, (esp US) preterit
adj verbim Imperfekt; (in English) → im Präteritum; preterite formImperfekt-/Präteritumsform f; the preterite tensedas Imperfekt, das Präteritum
nImperfekt nt, → Präteritum nt; in the preteriteim Imperfekt/Präteritum

preterite

[ˈprɛtrɪt] n(tempo) passato, preterito
References in periodicals archive ?
Summing up, Southwestern shows preference for wende in the 13th century, but favours went a century later, although the surviving old preterites are occasionally preserved in the later period.
In Iron, plurals and preterites to stems in final n have lost the nasal, e.
The best interpretation of the available evidence, then, is that early Indo-Aryan had a system of three contrasting preterites (see section 1) and that this developed first to a system of two oppositions, eliminating the contrast between perfect and imperfect, then to one with a single finite preterite.
Surely, an approach from the former perspective would begin by noting that the overwhelming majority of verbs having weak preterites in Germanic represent Indo-European derived formations, such as causative-iteratives and denominatives.
These forms were seen to occur in different ratios in the different varieties, but were not exclusive to L2 and ESD varieties, since British English also exhibits a fair number of preterites, be-periphrases and base forms (cf.
According to Pyles and Algeo (1982: 125), weak verbs "formed their preterites and past participles in the characteristically Germanic way, by the addition of a suffix containing d or immediately after consonants, t\ Many weak verbs were originally causative verbs derived from other categories, such as nouns or adjectives, by means of the "addition of a suffix with an i-sound that mutated the stem vowel of the word" (Pyles and Algeo 1982: 125).
Spanish TMA usage compared across bilinguals and a (near) monolingual child (5;0-6;0), and two bilingual adults Daisy Mike Nico Brennan V21 A46 sp Bil Bil Bil G2 G3 Ind mood: Present + + + + + + PresProgressive + + + + + + PeriphrFuture + + + + + + Preterite + * * * * * Imperfect + @ + @ + @ ImpProgress + + + + PastPeriFuture + + Conditional 1 PresPerfect + + + + Sub mood: Present + + + 0 Imperfect + + 0 "+" tense form is used according to the norms of general spoken Spanish; "*"closed list of stative verbs used with imperfect morphology in preterite-perfective contexts; "@" some preterites instead of imperfects; "0" form has failed to occur in a high number of obligatory contexts, Ind = Indicative; Sub = Subjunctive; Periphr, Peri = Periphrastic; Imp = Imperfect; Pres = Present.
Hogg & Fulk (2011: 299) comment briefly that preterite-present verbs "for semantic reasons developed in such a way that their preterites came to be used in present contexts and thus came to be regarded as present forms".
Among the topics are the Old Irish paradigm of clause types, long-vowel preterites in Indo-European, the inflection of the Hittite verb class of mema/i-, interpretation of the Tocharian subjunctive class III, the Phrygian middle, and cuneiform Luvian verbs in *-ye/o-.
However, a stative of enum is rare, an active stative of enum would be even more problematic, and a stative following two preterites would be syntactically strange.
Moyles, The Text of Paradise Lost: A Study in Editorial Procedure (Toronto, 1985), "Spelling Preterites and Past Participles" (pp.
The lack of discussion may unnecessarily handicap the reader since rhizotonic preterites and related forms are ubiquitous in Alfonsine texts.