pricing

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price

 (prīs)
n.
1. The amount as of money or goods, asked for or given in exchange for something else.
2. The cost at which something is obtained: believes that the price of success is hard work.
3. The cost of bribing someone: maintained that every person has a price.
4. A reward offered for the capture or killing of a person: a felon with a price on his head.
5. Archaic Value or worth.
tr.v. priced, pric·ing, pric·es
1. To fix or establish a price for: shoes that are priced at sixty dollars.
2. To find out the price of: spent the day pricing dresses.
Idiom:
price out of the market
To eliminate the demand for (goods or services) by setting prices too high.

[Middle English pris, from Old French, from Latin pretium; see per- in Indo-European roots.]

price′a·ble adj.
pric′er n.

pricing

(ˈpraɪsɪŋ)
n
the act or an instance of setting a price for a product or service(as modifier)
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pricing - the evaluation of something in terms of its pricepricing - the evaluation of something in terms of its price
rating, valuation, evaluation - an appraisal of the value of something; "he set a high valuation on friendship"
price gouging - pricing above the market price when no alternative retailer is available
Translations

pricing

[ˈpraɪsɪŋ]
A. Nfijación f de precios
B. CPD pricing policy Npolítica f tarifaria

pricing

[ˈpraɪsɪŋ]
n (= prices) → prix mpl
modif [structure] → des prix; [strategy, policy] → de prix
References in classic literature ?
And so we went gadding along, dropping in here and there, pricing things, and gossiping with the shop- keepers about the riot, and now and then running across pathetic reminders of it, in the persons of shunned and tearful and houseless remnants of families whose homes had been taken from them and their parents butchered or hanged.
They meant nothing to him really, since they never had any effect on him; but he treated them as he might have pieces of china in an auction-room, handling them with pleasure in their shape and their glaze, pricing them in his mind; and then, putting them back into their case, thought of them no more.
Three weeks later, Colonel Creighton, pricing Tibetan ghost-daggers at Lurgan's shop, faced Mahbub Ali openly mutinous.