lesion

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Related to primary lesion: macule

le·sion

 (lē′zhən)
n.
Any of various pathological or traumatic changes in a bodily organ or tissue, including tumors, ulcers, sores, and wounds.
tr.v. le·sioned, le·sion·ing, le·sions
To cause a lesion to form on or in.

[Middle English lesioun, from Old French lesion, from Latin laesiō, laesiōn-, from laesus, past participle of laedere, to injure.]

lesion

(ˈliːʒən)
n
1. (Pathology) any structural change in a bodily part resulting from injury or disease
2. (Pathology) an injury or wound
[C15: via Old French from Late Latin laesiō injury, from Latin laedere to hurt]

le•sion

(ˈli ʒən)
n.
1. an injury; hurt; wound.
2. any localized, usu. well-defined area of diseased or injured tissue or of abnormal structural change.
v.t.
3. to cause a lesion or lesions in.
[1425–75; < Middle French < Latin laesiō injury = Latin laed(ere) to injure + -tiō -tion]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lesion - any localized abnormal structural change in a bodily partlesion - any localized abnormal structural change in a bodily part
pathology - any deviation from a healthy or normal condition
tubercle - a swelling that is the characteristic lesion of tuberculosis
ulcer, ulceration - a circumscribed inflammatory and often suppurating lesion on the skin or an internal mucous surface resulting in necrosis of tissue
2.lesion - an injury to living tissue (especially an injury involving a cut or break in the skin)
harm, hurt, injury, trauma - any physical damage to the body caused by violence or accident or fracture etc.
raw wound - a wound that exposes subcutaneous tissue
stigmata - marks resembling the wounds on the crucified body of Christ
abrasion, excoriation, scratch, scrape - an abraded area where the skin is torn or worn off
gash, slash, slice, cut - a wound made by cutting; "he put a bandage over the cut"
laceration - a torn ragged wound
bite - a wound resulting from biting by an animal or a person

lesion

noun injury, hurt, wound, bruise, trauma (Pathology), sore, impairment, abrasion, contusion skin lesions
Translations
léze
vamma

lesion

[ˈliːʒən] Nlesión f

lesion

[ˈliːʒən] nlésion f

lesion

nVerletzung f; (= structural change)krankhafte Gewebsveränderung; lesions in the brainGehirnverletzungen pl

lesion

[ˈliːʒn] n (Med) → lesione f

le·sion

n. lesión, herida, contusión;
degenerative ______ degenerativa;
depressive ______ depresiva;
diffuse ______ difusa;
functional ______ funcional;
gross ______ grosera;
peripheral ______ periférica;
precancerous ______ precancerosa;
systemic ______ sistemática;
toxic ______ tóxica;
traumatic ______ traumática;
vascular ______ vascular;
whiplash ______ de latigazo.
V. cuadro en la página 167.

lesion

n lesión f
References in periodicals archive ?
In any case, recognizing this is very important, and for a primary lesion like this, it is important to look for ulcers in other locations," she said.
Chest radiographs, taken in search of the primary lesion, revealed a lesion in the right upper lung; on follow-up CT images, this lesion was suspect for malignancy (Figure).
Radiologically, CT, MRI, metaidbenzylguanidine scan and PET imaging are all used in locating the primary lesion and the detection of metastatic disease.
Thus the primary lesion was AI from previous endocarditis with secondary involvement of the MV.
A, Case 490 (SW0 negative): primary lesion showing atypical intraepidermal lentiginous proliferation of large melanoma cells with suprabasal pagetoid spread (arrows) and extensive dermal infiltration I epithelioid cells with nuclear atypia and focal pigmentation (arrowheads).
Given that our current patient presented without a known history of previously treated breast carcinoma, her disease was characterized as a primary lesion.
In addition, damage and irritation can be instigated by the primary lesion and create a reactive lesion on the contralateral side.
Patients with a primary lesion are at high risk (50%) of developing further skin cancer lesions in the following 5 years (Karagas et al.
Feuerman (3) stated that once carcinoma reaches the axillary lymph nodes from an extramammary source, the primary lesion is no longer "occult" it will be definitely detectable by initial diagnostic workup.
2,14) In dogs, osteosarcomas have been reported as a primary lesion associated with aneurysmal bone cysts.
The route of metastasis to the ileum depends upon the site of the primary lesion.
Contralateral involvement can be synchronous or metachronous up to 10 years after the primary lesion.

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