primary verb

primary verb

n.
One of the three verbs be, do, and have, that can function either as a main verb or an auxiliary verb.
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The heterogeneity of textual prototypes of the chronologically primary verb and its two derivatives usually rests on the word-forming sterility of the verb in the period when it was attested and its subsequent participation in the derivation of two deverbatives (1393 pairs).
Still their involvement in the chronologically heterogeneous sets of diachronic textual prototypes is limited to one in four of the one-root deverbal pairs with the primary verb.
The distribution of chronological heterogeneity in pairs of deverbatives with the chronologically primary verb depended upon their part-of-speech affiliation.
Placing the question at the end of verse 10 focuses on the primary verb so that the verse reads, "How can we thank God enough?
pronoun (=an=) here, this is impossible because the primary verb austa already has a direct object in teshan.
The purpose of the present paper is to try to compare four classes of idiomatic expressions of verbal nature -- phraseological verbs, phrasal verbs, primary verb idioms and prepositional verbs -- by means of some objective grammatical tests, such as passivisation, substitution, deletion or insertion and to determine in consequence which classes are more restricted in their grammatical behaviour and which are more free.
The third class are primary verb idioms (the term mine after Ruhl 1976).
However, when comparing tournures with primary verb idioms or phrasal verbs with prepositional verbs, it becomes evident which are more restricted and irregular and which are more free and less idiomatic in consequence.
Primary verb idioms is the term adopted by me after Ruhl (1976) to denote constructions composed of a primary verb (do, make, keep, get, take, leave etc.
The viability of even secondary subjecthood is associated ultimately with the transitivity of the primary verb.
Speaking verbs are divided into primary verbs, with speaking as reporting in the foreground (e.
They constitute, together with later ondreord, the so called, primary verbs in the sense that they are the immediate continuations of the earlier reduplicated preterites and that they initiate the development of a new pattern ('type') within the seventh class of strong verbs, forming the basis for analogical spread.