primate


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

pri·mate

 (prī′mĭt, -māt′)
n.
1. (prī′māt′) Any of various mammals of the order Primates, which consists of the lemurs, lorises, tarsiers, New World monkeys, Old World monkeys, and apes including humans, and is characterized by nails on the hands and feet, a short snout, and a large brain.
2. A bishop of highest rank in a province or country.

[From New Latin Prīmātēs, order name, from Latin prīmātēs, pl. of prīmās, principal, of first rank, from prīmus, first; see per in Indo-European roots. Sense 2, from Middle English primat, from Old French, from Medieval Latin prīmās, prīmāt-, from Latin.]

pri·ma′tial (-mā′shəl) adj.

primate

(ˈpraɪmeɪt)
n
(Animals) any placental mammal of the order Primates, typically having flexible hands and feet with opposable first digits, good eyesight, and, in the higher apes, a highly developed brain: includes lemurs, lorises, monkeys, apes, and man
adj
(Animals) of, relating to, or belonging to the order Primates
[C18: from New Latin primates, plural of prīmās principal, from prīmus first]

primate

(ˈpraɪmeɪt)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) another name for archbishop
2. (Anglicanism) Primate of all England the Archbishop of Canterbury
3. (Anglicanism) Primate of England the Archbishop of York
[C13: from Old French, from Latin prīmās principal, from prīmus first]
primatial adj

pri•mate

(ˈpraɪ meɪt or, esp. for 1, -mɪt)

n.
1. an archbishop or bishop ranking first among the bishops of a province or country.
2. any mammal of the order Primates, comprising the three suborders Anthropoidea (humans, apes, Old World monkeys, and New World monkeys), Prosimii (lemurs, lorises, and bush babies), and Tarsioidea (tarsiers).
3. Archaic. a chief or leader.
[1175–1225; Middle English primat dignitary, religious leader < Late Latin prīmāt- (s. of prīmās), n. use of Latin prīmās of first rank, derivative of prīmus first (see prime); (definition 2) taken as singular of New Latin Primates Primates, as if ending in -ate1]
pri•ma′tal, adj., n.
pri•ma′tial (-ˈmeɪ ʃəl)
pri′mate•ship` (-mɪtˌʃɪp, -meɪt-) n.

pri·mate

(prī′māt′)
Any of various mammals having a highly developed brain, eyes facing forward, a shortened nose and muzzle, and opposable thumbs. Primates usually live in groups with complex social systems, and their high intelligence allows them to adapt their behavior successfully to different environments. Lemurs, monkeys, apes, and humans are primates.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.primate - a senior clergyman and dignitaryprimate - a senior clergyman and dignitary  
priest - a clergyman in Christian churches who has the authority to perform or administer various religious rites; one of the Holy Orders
2.primate - any placental mammal of the order Primates; has good eyesight and flexible hands and feet
eutherian, eutherian mammal, placental, placental mammal - mammals having a placenta; all mammals except monotremes and marsupials
order Primates, Primates - an animal order including lemurs and tarsiers and monkeys and apes and human beings
simian - an ape or monkey
ape - any of various primates with short tails or no tail at all
anthropoid - any member of the suborder Anthropoidea including monkeys and apes and hominids
hominoid - a primate of the superfamily Hominoidea
hominid - a primate of the family Hominidae
monkey - any of various long-tailed primates (excluding the prosimians)
prosimian - primitive primates having large ears and eyes and characterized by nocturnal habits
lemur - large-eyed arboreal prosimian having foxy faces and long furry tails
tarsier - nocturnal arboreal primate of Indonesia and the Philippines having huge eyes and digits ending in pads to facilitate climbing; the only primate that spurns all plant material as food living entirely on insects and small vertebrates

primate

noun see monkeys, apes and other primates
Translations
رَئيس أساقِفَهرَئيسيّات: أعلى درجة من الثَّدْيِيّات
arcibiskupprimát
ærkebiskoppattedyrprimat
erkibiskupprímati, fremdardÿr
arhibīskapsprimāts
primata
primát
başparmaklıbaşpiskoposprimat

primate

[ˈpraɪmeɪt] N
1. (Zool) → primate m
2. (Rel) → primado m

primate

[ˈpraɪmeɪt] n
(= animal) → primate m
[ˈpraɪmət] (= priest) → primat m

primate

n
(Zool) → Primat m
(Eccl) → Primas m; Primate of England/all EnglandErzbischof von York/Canterbury

primate

[sense a ˈpraɪmeɪt, sense b ˈpraɪmɪt] n
a. (Zool) → primate m
b. (Rel) → primate m

primate1

(ˈpraimeit) noun
an archbishop.

primate2

(ˈpraimət) noun
a member of the highest order of mammals, ie man, monkeys, apes, lemurs.
References in classic literature ?
I can, sir,' said Haidee, drawing from under her veil a satin satchel highly perfumed; `for here is the register of my birth, signed by my father and his principal officers, and that of my baptism, my father having consented to my being brought up in my mother's faith, -- this latter has been sealed by the grand primate of Macedonia and Epirus; and lastly (and perhaps the most important), the record of the sale of my person and that of my mother to the Armenian merchant El-Kobbir, by the French officer, who, in his infamous bargain with the Porte, had reserved as his part of the booty the wife and daughter of his benefactor, whom he sold for the sum of four hundred thousand francs.
The bigoted and haughty primate, Laud, Archbishop of Canterbury, controlled the religious affairs of the realm, and was consequently invested with powers which might have wrought the utter ruin of the two Puritan colonies, Plymouth and Massachusetts.
The authority this man, whose name was Kolory, seemed to exercise over the rest, the episcopal part he took in the Feast of Calabashes, his sleek and complacent appearance, the mystic characters which were tattooed upon his chest, and above all the mitre he frequently wore, in the shape of a towering head-dress, consisting of part of a cocoanut branch, the stalk planted uprightly on his brow, and the leaflets gathered together and passed round the temples and behind the ears, all these pointed him out as Lord Primate of Typee.
And yet Mehevi, and other chiefs of unquestionable veracity--to say nothing of the Primate himself--assured me over and over again that Moa Artua was the tutelary deity of Typee, and was more to be held in honour than a whole battalion of the clumsy idols in the Hoolah Hoolah grounds.
One would almost imagine from the long list that is given of cannibal primates, bishops, arch-deacons, prebendaries, and other inferior ecclesiastics, that the sacerdotal order far outnumbered the rest of the population, and that the poor natives were more severely priest-ridden than even the inhabitants of the papal states.
Charles, Cardinal de Bourbon, Archbishop and Comte of Lyon, Primate of the Gauls, was allied both to Louis XI.
primates, prebendaries, pilgrims, prophets, imaums, beneficiaries,
If he struggled up from barbarism, and still more remotely from the lower Primates, his ideal should be to surpass man himself and reach Superman (see especially the Prologue).
Scientists had suspected that African animals got the primate ball rolling in the Americas, but the new finds provide the first fossil backup for the scenario.
An international team of scientists working with primates in zoos, sanctuaries, and in the wild examined daily energy expenditure in 17 primate species, from gorillas to mouse lemurs, to test whether primates' slow pace of life results from a slow metabolism.
The world's oldest primate fossil skeleton has been discovered in China's Hubei province.
Primates in Peril: The World's 25 Most Endangered Primates, 2012-2014 has been compiled by the Primate Specialist Group of IUCN's Species Survival Commission (SSC) and the International Primatological Society (IPS), in collaboration with Conservation International (CI) and the Bristol Conservation and Science Foundation (BCSF).