printed


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print

 (prĭnt)
n.
1.
a. A mark or impression made in or on a surface by pressure: the print of footsteps in the sand.
b. A fingerprint.
2.
a. A device or implement, such as a stamp, die, or seal, used to press markings onto or into a surface: fancy letters made by hand-carved prints.
b. Something formed or marked by such a device.
3.
a. Text, lettering, or other marks produced in ink from type as by a printing press or from digital fonts by an electronic printer: needed glasses to read the print.
b. Printed state or form: a short story that never got into print.
4. A printed publication or edition of a text; a printing: The first print of that book has sold out.
5. A design or picture transferred from an engraved plate, wood block, lithographic stone, or other medium: had prints of flowers hanging on the walls.
6. A photographic image transferred to paper or a similar surface.
7. A copy of a movie made on film or in a high resolution digital format, as for public exhibition.
8.
a. A fabric or garment with a dyed pattern that has been pressed onto it, usually by engraved rollers.
b. The pattern itself: a blouse with a paisley print.
v. print·ed, print·ing, prints
v.tr.
1. To press (a mark or design, for example) onto or into a surface: tracks that were printed in the snow.
2.
a. To make an impression on or in (a surface) with a device such as a stamp, seal, or die.
b. To press (something, such as a stamp) onto or into a surface to leave a marking.
3.
a. To produce by means of pressed type, an electronic printer, or similar means, on a paper surface: printed more copies of the ad.
b. To offer in printed form; publish: The publisher collected the essays and printed them as a book.
4.
a. To reproduce (a digital document or image) on a paper surface: printed the email.
b. To convert (a digital document) into a file format designed for publication.
5. To write (something) in characters similar to those commonly used in print.
6. To impress firmly in the mind or memory: an experience that will be printed in our hearts forever.
7. To produce a photographic image from (a negative, for example) by passing light through film onto a photosensitive surface, especially sensitized paper.
8. To produce (an electronic component) by mechanically transferring a circuit or circuit pattern onto a nonconductive surface.
9. To fabricate (an object) by means of a 3D printer.
v.intr.
1.
a. To work as a printer.
b. To produce something in printed form by means of a printing press or other reproduction process.
2. To write characters similar to those commonly used in print.
3. To produce or receive an impression, marking, or image: The negative printed poorly.
adj.
1. Published or reproduced by printing, especially in contrast to electronic publication: a print newsletter.
2. Relating to or involved in media based on printing, especially newspapers and magazines: a print journalist.
Idioms:
in print
1. In printed or published form: denials that were to be found in print.
2. Offered for sale by a publisher: books that are still in print.
out of print
No longer offered for sale by a publisher: books that are out of print.

[Middle English prent, print, from Old French priente, from feminine past participle of preindre, to press, alteration (on the model of the more common type of Old French verb having an infinitive ending in -ndre, such as peindre, to paint) of priembre, from Latin premere; see per- in Indo-European roots.]

printed

(ˈprɪntɪd)
adj
1. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) of or relating to something written, printed, or published
2. (Journalism & Publishing) of or relating to something written, printed, or published
Translations

printed

[ˈprɪntɪd] ADJ
1. (Publishing) → impreso
the printed bookel libro impreso
printed matterimpresos mpl
the printed pageel impreso
printed papersimpresos mpl
printed paper rate (Brit) → tarifa f de impreso
the printed wordla palabra impresa
2. (Textiles) → estampado
a printed cotton fabricuna tela de algodón estampada
3. (Electronics) printed circuitcircuito m impreso
printed circuit boardplaca f de circuito impreso

printed

adjDruck-, gedruckt; (= written in capitals)in Großbuchstaben; fabricbedruckt; printed matter/papersBüchersendung f; the printed worddas gedruckte Wort; the printed bookdas gedruckte or veröffentlichte Buch; the printed pagedie gedruckte Seite; in printed formin gedruckter Form; printed circuitgedruckte Schaltung; printed circuit boardLeiterplatte f

printed

[ˈprɪntɪd] adjstampato/a
the power of the printed word → il potere di tutto ciò che è stampato
References in classic literature ?
One of the first books he printed was Malory's Morte d'Arthur.
In the preface Caxton tells us how, after he had printed some other books, many gentlemen came to him to ask him why he did not print a history of King Arthur, "which ought most to be remembered among us Englishmen afore all the Christian kings; to whom I answered that diverse men hold opinion that there was no such Arthur, and all such books as be made of him be but fained matters and fables.
It was the pulpit and the manuscript taking the alarm at the printed word: something similar to the stupor of a sparrow which should behold the angel Legion unfold his six million wings.
In its printed form, thought is more imperishable than ever; it is volatile, irresistible, indestructible.
The poet blushed again, and said: "I do not think that can be the case, for my verses have never been printed.
His collection is interesting and important, not only as the parent source or foundation of the earlier printed versions of Aesop, but as the direct channel of attracting to these fables the attention of the learned.
Melville's 'John Marr and Other Sailors,' of which twenty-five copies only were printed, on the one hand, and Mr.
The duke went down into his carpet- bag, and fetched up a lot of little printed bills and read them out loud.
Only ask Portugal, Barcelona, and Valencia, where they have been printed, and moreover there is a report that it is being printed at Antwerp, and I am persuaded there will not be a country or language in which there will not be a translation of it.
No, but I read all her pieces, and I know a fellow who works in the office where this paper is printed.
It was called simply The Life-Book of Captain Jim, and on the title page the names of Owen Ford and James Boyd were printed as collaborators.
I don't think it will be much of a newspaper if it isn't printed," said Dan scornfully.